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Kinetic and stoichiometric characterization of organoautotrophic growth of Ralstonia eutropha on formic acid in fed-batch and continuous cultures.

Grunwald S, Mottet A, Grousseau E, Plassmeier JK, Popović MK, Uribelarrea JL, Gorret N, Guillouet SE, Sinskey A - Microb Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: Formic acid, acting as both carbon and energy source, is a safe alternative to a carbon dioxide, hydrogen and dioxygen mix for studying the conversion of carbon through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle into value-added chemical compounds by non-photosynthetic microorganisms.The stoichiometric study highlighted the imbalance between carbon and energy provided by formic acid and explained the low growth yields measured.High formic acid sensitivity was found in R eutropha since a linear decrease in the biomass yield with increasing residual formic acid concentrations was observed between 0 and 1.5 g l(-1) .

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bldg. 68-370, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA; Department of Biotechnology, Beuth Hochschule für Technik Berlin, 13353, Berlin, Germany.

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Growth of R. eutropha in a pH-controlled fed batch fermentation with formic acid as the sole substrate. Three different initial concentrations (A: 0.5 g l−1; B: 1.0 g l−1 and C: 2.0 g l−1) of formic acid were used to initiate the pH-controlled feeding. One culture for each initial concentration is depicted in the figure. The experiments were performed in duplicate.1. Biomass and residual formic acid concentrations over time.2. Total biomass produced over time.3. Total formic acid consumed over time.
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fig02: Growth of R. eutropha in a pH-controlled fed batch fermentation with formic acid as the sole substrate. Three different initial concentrations (A: 0.5 g l−1; B: 1.0 g l−1 and C: 2.0 g l−1) of formic acid were used to initiate the pH-controlled feeding. One culture for each initial concentration is depicted in the figure. The experiments were performed in duplicate.1. Biomass and residual formic acid concentrations over time.2. Total biomass produced over time.3. Total formic acid consumed over time.

Mentions: Three different initial concentrations of pH-corrected formic acid (pH 6.5): 0.5 g l−1 (A), 1.0 g l−1 (B) and 2.0 g l−1 (C) were used to initiate the pH-controlled feeding (Fig. 2). Each culture was performed in duplicate.


Kinetic and stoichiometric characterization of organoautotrophic growth of Ralstonia eutropha on formic acid in fed-batch and continuous cultures.

Grunwald S, Mottet A, Grousseau E, Plassmeier JK, Popović MK, Uribelarrea JL, Gorret N, Guillouet SE, Sinskey A - Microb Biotechnol (2014)

Growth of R. eutropha in a pH-controlled fed batch fermentation with formic acid as the sole substrate. Three different initial concentrations (A: 0.5 g l−1; B: 1.0 g l−1 and C: 2.0 g l−1) of formic acid were used to initiate the pH-controlled feeding. One culture for each initial concentration is depicted in the figure. The experiments were performed in duplicate.1. Biomass and residual formic acid concentrations over time.2. Total biomass produced over time.3. Total formic acid consumed over time.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321381&req=5

fig02: Growth of R. eutropha in a pH-controlled fed batch fermentation with formic acid as the sole substrate. Three different initial concentrations (A: 0.5 g l−1; B: 1.0 g l−1 and C: 2.0 g l−1) of formic acid were used to initiate the pH-controlled feeding. One culture for each initial concentration is depicted in the figure. The experiments were performed in duplicate.1. Biomass and residual formic acid concentrations over time.2. Total biomass produced over time.3. Total formic acid consumed over time.
Mentions: Three different initial concentrations of pH-corrected formic acid (pH 6.5): 0.5 g l−1 (A), 1.0 g l−1 (B) and 2.0 g l−1 (C) were used to initiate the pH-controlled feeding (Fig. 2). Each culture was performed in duplicate.

Bottom Line: Formic acid, acting as both carbon and energy source, is a safe alternative to a carbon dioxide, hydrogen and dioxygen mix for studying the conversion of carbon through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle into value-added chemical compounds by non-photosynthetic microorganisms.The stoichiometric study highlighted the imbalance between carbon and energy provided by formic acid and explained the low growth yields measured.High formic acid sensitivity was found in R eutropha since a linear decrease in the biomass yield with increasing residual formic acid concentrations was observed between 0 and 1.5 g l(-1) .

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bldg. 68-370, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA; Department of Biotechnology, Beuth Hochschule für Technik Berlin, 13353, Berlin, Germany.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus