Limits...
Restoration of a Mediterranean forest after a fire: bioremediation and rhizoremediation field-scale trial.

Pizarro-Tobías P, Fernández M, Niqui JL, Solano J, Duque E, Ramos JL, Roca A - Microb Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: After fires, soils are more likely to erode and resilience is inhibited in part by the toxic aromatic hydrocarbons produced during the combustion of cellulose and lignins.After 8 months of monitoring soil quality parameters, including the removal of monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as vegetation cover, we found that the site had returned to pre-fire status.The results obtained in this study indicate that the rhizoremediation strategy could be presented as a viable and cost-effective alternative for the treatment of ecosystems affected by fires.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bio-Ilíberis R&D, Polígono Industrial Juncaril, Peligros, Granada, 18210, Spain.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

pH measurements performed along the study during 8 months, on pristine soil (P) (filled circle), burnt bulk soil (C) (filled diamond), bioremediation (B) (triangle) and rhizoremediation (R) (square), and plants control (CP) (hexagon). Data are shown as mean (n = 3) and error bars refer to standard deviations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321375&req=5

fig04: pH measurements performed along the study during 8 months, on pristine soil (P) (filled circle), burnt bulk soil (C) (filled diamond), bioremediation (B) (triangle) and rhizoremediation (R) (square), and plants control (CP) (hexagon). Data are shown as mean (n = 3) and error bars refer to standard deviations.

Mentions: A significant soil alkalynization (P < 0.05) was observed in burnt soil (pH 7.63 ± 0.11) versus control pristine soil (pH 6.53 ± 0.15) (Fig. 4). pH among burnt soil treatments (Control bulk soil, Plants control, Bioremediation and Rhizoremediation) showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the first 4 months of treatment. Then, all treatments experienced a progressive decrease of pH. Nevertheless, both soils treated with Bioremediation and Rhizoremediation treatments experienced a decrease in pH (6.63 ± 0.05 and 6.73 ± 0.04, respectively), reaching Control pristine soil pH levels (6.70 ± 0.04) after 5 months (22 weeks).


Restoration of a Mediterranean forest after a fire: bioremediation and rhizoremediation field-scale trial.

Pizarro-Tobías P, Fernández M, Niqui JL, Solano J, Duque E, Ramos JL, Roca A - Microb Biotechnol (2014)

pH measurements performed along the study during 8 months, on pristine soil (P) (filled circle), burnt bulk soil (C) (filled diamond), bioremediation (B) (triangle) and rhizoremediation (R) (square), and plants control (CP) (hexagon). Data are shown as mean (n = 3) and error bars refer to standard deviations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321375&req=5

fig04: pH measurements performed along the study during 8 months, on pristine soil (P) (filled circle), burnt bulk soil (C) (filled diamond), bioremediation (B) (triangle) and rhizoremediation (R) (square), and plants control (CP) (hexagon). Data are shown as mean (n = 3) and error bars refer to standard deviations.
Mentions: A significant soil alkalynization (P < 0.05) was observed in burnt soil (pH 7.63 ± 0.11) versus control pristine soil (pH 6.53 ± 0.15) (Fig. 4). pH among burnt soil treatments (Control bulk soil, Plants control, Bioremediation and Rhizoremediation) showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the first 4 months of treatment. Then, all treatments experienced a progressive decrease of pH. Nevertheless, both soils treated with Bioremediation and Rhizoremediation treatments experienced a decrease in pH (6.63 ± 0.05 and 6.73 ± 0.04, respectively), reaching Control pristine soil pH levels (6.70 ± 0.04) after 5 months (22 weeks).

Bottom Line: After fires, soils are more likely to erode and resilience is inhibited in part by the toxic aromatic hydrocarbons produced during the combustion of cellulose and lignins.After 8 months of monitoring soil quality parameters, including the removal of monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as vegetation cover, we found that the site had returned to pre-fire status.The results obtained in this study indicate that the rhizoremediation strategy could be presented as a viable and cost-effective alternative for the treatment of ecosystems affected by fires.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bio-Ilíberis R&D, Polígono Industrial Juncaril, Peligros, Granada, 18210, Spain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus