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Restoration of a Mediterranean forest after a fire: bioremediation and rhizoremediation field-scale trial.

Pizarro-Tobías P, Fernández M, Niqui JL, Solano J, Duque E, Ramos JL, Roca A - Microb Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: After fires, soils are more likely to erode and resilience is inhibited in part by the toxic aromatic hydrocarbons produced during the combustion of cellulose and lignins.After 8 months of monitoring soil quality parameters, including the removal of monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as vegetation cover, we found that the site had returned to pre-fire status.The results obtained in this study indicate that the rhizoremediation strategy could be presented as a viable and cost-effective alternative for the treatment of ecosystems affected by fires.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bio-Ilíberis R&D, Polígono Industrial Juncaril, Peligros, Granada, 18210, Spain.

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Relative abundance of phylogenetic groups at phylum level based on 16S rRNA genes. Pristine soil, bulk burnt soil and rhizoremediation treatment at two different times of the assay 1 month (autumn) and 6 months (spring).
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fig02: Relative abundance of phylogenetic groups at phylum level based on 16S rRNA genes. Pristine soil, bulk burnt soil and rhizoremediation treatment at two different times of the assay 1 month (autumn) and 6 months (spring).

Mentions: The analysis of relative abundance at phylum level (Fig. 2) showed changes in the bacterial community distribution and proportion. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Bacteriodetes were the predominant phyla in all the cases we studied; combined, these three phyla constituted 80% of the total. Specifically, Acidobacteria, which was the prevailing phylum in pristine soil and 46% of the total, experienced a remarkable population reduction to 29% of the total in burnt soil. In contrast to Acidobacteria, an increase in the proportion of Proteobacteria (from 31.3% to 38.6%) and Bacteriodetes (from 8.4% to 12.9%) was observed in Control burnt soil.


Restoration of a Mediterranean forest after a fire: bioremediation and rhizoremediation field-scale trial.

Pizarro-Tobías P, Fernández M, Niqui JL, Solano J, Duque E, Ramos JL, Roca A - Microb Biotechnol (2014)

Relative abundance of phylogenetic groups at phylum level based on 16S rRNA genes. Pristine soil, bulk burnt soil and rhizoremediation treatment at two different times of the assay 1 month (autumn) and 6 months (spring).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321375&req=5

fig02: Relative abundance of phylogenetic groups at phylum level based on 16S rRNA genes. Pristine soil, bulk burnt soil and rhizoremediation treatment at two different times of the assay 1 month (autumn) and 6 months (spring).
Mentions: The analysis of relative abundance at phylum level (Fig. 2) showed changes in the bacterial community distribution and proportion. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Bacteriodetes were the predominant phyla in all the cases we studied; combined, these three phyla constituted 80% of the total. Specifically, Acidobacteria, which was the prevailing phylum in pristine soil and 46% of the total, experienced a remarkable population reduction to 29% of the total in burnt soil. In contrast to Acidobacteria, an increase in the proportion of Proteobacteria (from 31.3% to 38.6%) and Bacteriodetes (from 8.4% to 12.9%) was observed in Control burnt soil.

Bottom Line: After fires, soils are more likely to erode and resilience is inhibited in part by the toxic aromatic hydrocarbons produced during the combustion of cellulose and lignins.After 8 months of monitoring soil quality parameters, including the removal of monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as vegetation cover, we found that the site had returned to pre-fire status.The results obtained in this study indicate that the rhizoremediation strategy could be presented as a viable and cost-effective alternative for the treatment of ecosystems affected by fires.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bio-Ilíberis R&D, Polígono Industrial Juncaril, Peligros, Granada, 18210, Spain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus