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Restoration of a Mediterranean forest after a fire: bioremediation and rhizoremediation field-scale trial.

Pizarro-Tobías P, Fernández M, Niqui JL, Solano J, Duque E, Ramos JL, Roca A - Microb Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: After fires, soils are more likely to erode and resilience is inhibited in part by the toxic aromatic hydrocarbons produced during the combustion of cellulose and lignins.After 8 months of monitoring soil quality parameters, including the removal of monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as vegetation cover, we found that the site had returned to pre-fire status.The results obtained in this study indicate that the rhizoremediation strategy could be presented as a viable and cost-effective alternative for the treatment of ecosystems affected by fires.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bio-Ilíberis R&D, Polígono Industrial Juncaril, Peligros, Granada, 18210, Spain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Viable P. putida BIRD-1 (A), P. putida KT2440 (B) and indigenous microbial consortium (C) in rhizosphere of introduced plants in pristine soil (Treated) (filled circle), in the rhizosphere of introduced plants in burnt soil (Rhizoremediation) (square) and in burnt bulk soil (Bioremediation) (triangle). Data showed as mean (n = 3) and error bars refer to standard deviations.
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fig01: Viable P. putida BIRD-1 (A), P. putida KT2440 (B) and indigenous microbial consortium (C) in rhizosphere of introduced plants in pristine soil (Treated) (filled circle), in the rhizosphere of introduced plants in burnt soil (Rhizoremediation) (square) and in burnt bulk soil (Bioremediation) (triangle). Data showed as mean (n = 3) and error bars refer to standard deviations.

Mentions: The survival of the introduced microbial consortium (Pseudomonas putida strains and indigenous culturable bacteria with biodegradation potential) in burnt bulk soil (Bioremediation treatment), rhizosphere of introduced plants in burnt soil (Rhizoremediation treatment) and in the rhizosphere of plants in pristine soil (Treated control) (Table 1, Fig. 1) was determined by plate counting on selective media; besides, survival of introduced P. putida strains was verified by either polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or colony hybridization. The two P. putida strains, P. putida BIRD-1 and KT2440, that were introduced in soil were able to survive and maintained a population size around 106 colony-forming unit (cfu) g−1 soil (from 6.7 × 106 ± 1.1 × 106 to 5.7 × 105 ± 1.7 × 104 cfu g−1 soil) for about six months (26 weeks), and then dropped below detection limits during the aestival season (Fig. 1A and B). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were detected in the survival of these strains the rhizosphere of plants in the rhizoremediation treatment compared to the treated pristine treatment in most of the sampling times during the first 24 weeks (6 months). Cell densities of these strains in burnt bulk soil (Bioremediation treatment), were significantly lower (P  < 0.05) (two orders of magnitude) than in the rhizosphere of plants, whether in burnt or pristine soil. This indicates that survival improved when the strains were associated to plants, especially in the case of P. putida BIRD-1 that was detected for seven months in rhizospheric soil.


Restoration of a Mediterranean forest after a fire: bioremediation and rhizoremediation field-scale trial.

Pizarro-Tobías P, Fernández M, Niqui JL, Solano J, Duque E, Ramos JL, Roca A - Microb Biotechnol (2014)

Viable P. putida BIRD-1 (A), P. putida KT2440 (B) and indigenous microbial consortium (C) in rhizosphere of introduced plants in pristine soil (Treated) (filled circle), in the rhizosphere of introduced plants in burnt soil (Rhizoremediation) (square) and in burnt bulk soil (Bioremediation) (triangle). Data showed as mean (n = 3) and error bars refer to standard deviations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321375&req=5

fig01: Viable P. putida BIRD-1 (A), P. putida KT2440 (B) and indigenous microbial consortium (C) in rhizosphere of introduced plants in pristine soil (Treated) (filled circle), in the rhizosphere of introduced plants in burnt soil (Rhizoremediation) (square) and in burnt bulk soil (Bioremediation) (triangle). Data showed as mean (n = 3) and error bars refer to standard deviations.
Mentions: The survival of the introduced microbial consortium (Pseudomonas putida strains and indigenous culturable bacteria with biodegradation potential) in burnt bulk soil (Bioremediation treatment), rhizosphere of introduced plants in burnt soil (Rhizoremediation treatment) and in the rhizosphere of plants in pristine soil (Treated control) (Table 1, Fig. 1) was determined by plate counting on selective media; besides, survival of introduced P. putida strains was verified by either polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or colony hybridization. The two P. putida strains, P. putida BIRD-1 and KT2440, that were introduced in soil were able to survive and maintained a population size around 106 colony-forming unit (cfu) g−1 soil (from 6.7 × 106 ± 1.1 × 106 to 5.7 × 105 ± 1.7 × 104 cfu g−1 soil) for about six months (26 weeks), and then dropped below detection limits during the aestival season (Fig. 1A and B). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were detected in the survival of these strains the rhizosphere of plants in the rhizoremediation treatment compared to the treated pristine treatment in most of the sampling times during the first 24 weeks (6 months). Cell densities of these strains in burnt bulk soil (Bioremediation treatment), were significantly lower (P  < 0.05) (two orders of magnitude) than in the rhizosphere of plants, whether in burnt or pristine soil. This indicates that survival improved when the strains were associated to plants, especially in the case of P. putida BIRD-1 that was detected for seven months in rhizospheric soil.

Bottom Line: After fires, soils are more likely to erode and resilience is inhibited in part by the toxic aromatic hydrocarbons produced during the combustion of cellulose and lignins.After 8 months of monitoring soil quality parameters, including the removal of monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as vegetation cover, we found that the site had returned to pre-fire status.The results obtained in this study indicate that the rhizoremediation strategy could be presented as a viable and cost-effective alternative for the treatment of ecosystems affected by fires.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bio-Ilíberis R&D, Polígono Industrial Juncaril, Peligros, Granada, 18210, Spain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus