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A small RNA mediated regulation of a stress-activated retrotransposon and the tissue specific transposition during the reproductive period in Arabidopsis.

Matsunaga W, Ohama N, Tanabe N, Masuta Y, Masuda S, Mitani N, Yamaguchi-Shinozaki K, Ma JF, Kato A, Ito H - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that transcriptional activation of ONSEN was regulated by a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-related pathway, and the activation could also be induced by oxidative stress.The transposition was also detected in the progeny, which originated from tissue that had differentiated after exposure to the HS.The results indicated that in some undifferentiated cells, transpositional activity could be maintained quite long after exposure to the HS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo Japan.

ABSTRACT
Transposable elements (TEs) are key elements that facilitate genome evolution of the host organism. A number of studies have assessed the functions of TEs, which change gene expression in the host genome. Activation of TEs is controlled by epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. Several recent studies have reported that TEs can also be activated by biotic or abiotic stress in some plants. We focused on a Ty1/copia retrotransposon, ONSEN, that is activated by heat stress (HS) in Arabidopsis. We found that transcriptional activation of ONSEN was regulated by a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-related pathway, and the activation could also be induced by oxidative stress. Mutants deficient in siRNA biogenesis that were exposed to HS at the initial stages of vegetative growth showed transgenerational transposition. The transposition was also detected in the progeny, which originated from tissue that had differentiated after exposure to the HS. The results indicated that in some undifferentiated cells, transpositional activity could be maintained quite long after exposure to the HS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transgenerational transposition of ONSEN in young seedling. (A) Scheme of the HS experiment. On each day after germination, seedlings were exposed to HS for 24 h. (B,C) Southern blot analysis of ONSEN using the progeny of WT (B) and nrpd1(C) plants that were exposed to HS, as indicated in (A). Durations of HS are indicated over the lanes. NS plants were used as controls. Arrowheads indicate the transposed copies of ONSEN.
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Figure 5: Transgenerational transposition of ONSEN in young seedling. (A) Scheme of the HS experiment. On each day after germination, seedlings were exposed to HS for 24 h. (B,C) Southern blot analysis of ONSEN using the progeny of WT (B) and nrpd1(C) plants that were exposed to HS, as indicated in (A). Durations of HS are indicated over the lanes. NS plants were used as controls. Arrowheads indicate the transposed copies of ONSEN.

Mentions: To investigate how the timing of the HS response in young seedlings affected transgenerational transposition, seedlings of the nrpd1 and WT plants, at ages ranging from 1 to 6 days after germination, were exposed to 37∘C for 24 h (Figure 5A). Transgenerational transposition was analyzed in the progenies of heat-stressed plants. The new copies were not detected in the progeny of WT plants (Figure 5B), but they were detected in the progeny of stressed nrpd1 plants (Figure 5C). Interestingly, transgenerational transposition was observed in seedlings whose parents were stressed at a very early developmental stage, as young as 1 day old (Figure 5C).


A small RNA mediated regulation of a stress-activated retrotransposon and the tissue specific transposition during the reproductive period in Arabidopsis.

Matsunaga W, Ohama N, Tanabe N, Masuta Y, Masuda S, Mitani N, Yamaguchi-Shinozaki K, Ma JF, Kato A, Ito H - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Transgenerational transposition of ONSEN in young seedling. (A) Scheme of the HS experiment. On each day after germination, seedlings were exposed to HS for 24 h. (B,C) Southern blot analysis of ONSEN using the progeny of WT (B) and nrpd1(C) plants that were exposed to HS, as indicated in (A). Durations of HS are indicated over the lanes. NS plants were used as controls. Arrowheads indicate the transposed copies of ONSEN.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321352&req=5

Figure 5: Transgenerational transposition of ONSEN in young seedling. (A) Scheme of the HS experiment. On each day after germination, seedlings were exposed to HS for 24 h. (B,C) Southern blot analysis of ONSEN using the progeny of WT (B) and nrpd1(C) plants that were exposed to HS, as indicated in (A). Durations of HS are indicated over the lanes. NS plants were used as controls. Arrowheads indicate the transposed copies of ONSEN.
Mentions: To investigate how the timing of the HS response in young seedlings affected transgenerational transposition, seedlings of the nrpd1 and WT plants, at ages ranging from 1 to 6 days after germination, were exposed to 37∘C for 24 h (Figure 5A). Transgenerational transposition was analyzed in the progenies of heat-stressed plants. The new copies were not detected in the progeny of WT plants (Figure 5B), but they were detected in the progeny of stressed nrpd1 plants (Figure 5C). Interestingly, transgenerational transposition was observed in seedlings whose parents were stressed at a very early developmental stage, as young as 1 day old (Figure 5C).

Bottom Line: We found that transcriptional activation of ONSEN was regulated by a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-related pathway, and the activation could also be induced by oxidative stress.The transposition was also detected in the progeny, which originated from tissue that had differentiated after exposure to the HS.The results indicated that in some undifferentiated cells, transpositional activity could be maintained quite long after exposure to the HS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo Japan.

ABSTRACT
Transposable elements (TEs) are key elements that facilitate genome evolution of the host organism. A number of studies have assessed the functions of TEs, which change gene expression in the host genome. Activation of TEs is controlled by epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. Several recent studies have reported that TEs can also be activated by biotic or abiotic stress in some plants. We focused on a Ty1/copia retrotransposon, ONSEN, that is activated by heat stress (HS) in Arabidopsis. We found that transcriptional activation of ONSEN was regulated by a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-related pathway, and the activation could also be induced by oxidative stress. Mutants deficient in siRNA biogenesis that were exposed to HS at the initial stages of vegetative growth showed transgenerational transposition. The transposition was also detected in the progeny, which originated from tissue that had differentiated after exposure to the HS. The results indicated that in some undifferentiated cells, transpositional activity could be maintained quite long after exposure to the HS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus