Limits...
Searching for the origins of musicality across species.

Hoeschele M, Merchant H, Kikuchi Y, Hattori Y, ten Cate C - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: In the introduction to this theme issue, Honing et al. suggest that the origins of musicality--the capacity that makes it possible for us to perceive, appreciate and produce music--can be pursued productively by searching for components of musicality in other species.Recent studies have highlighted that the behavioural relevance of stimuli to animals and the relation of experimental procedures to their natural behaviour can have a large impact on the type of results that can be obtained for a given species.These two approaches are both vital in the comparative study of musicality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cognitive Biology, Vienna, Austria marisa.hoeschele@univie.ac.at.

ABSTRACT
In the introduction to this theme issue, Honing et al. suggest that the origins of musicality--the capacity that makes it possible for us to perceive, appreciate and produce music--can be pursued productively by searching for components of musicality in other species. Recent studies have highlighted that the behavioural relevance of stimuli to animals and the relation of experimental procedures to their natural behaviour can have a large impact on the type of results that can be obtained for a given species. Through reviewing laboratory findings on animal auditory perception and behaviour, as well as relevant findings on natural behaviour, we provide evidence that both traditional laboratory studies and studies relating to natural behaviour are needed to answer the problem of musicality. Traditional laboratory studies use synthetic stimuli that provide more control than more naturalistic studies, and are in many ways suitable to test the perceptual abilities of animals. However, naturalistic studies are essential to inform us as to what might constitute relevant stimuli and parameters to test with laboratory studies, or why we may or may not expect certain stimulus manipulations to be relevant. These two approaches are both vital in the comparative study of musicality.

Show MeSH
Species with vocal learning and entrainment abilities and their relationship in a phylogenetic tree.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321135&req=5

RSTB20140094F1: Species with vocal learning and entrainment abilities and their relationship in a phylogenetic tree.

Mentions: The two best known features of musicality found in distantly related species are vocal learning and entrainment (see glossary, table 1). There are suggestions that the two abilities are related [94]. To date, the species that have been shown to exhibit both vocal learning and entrainment are distantly related to humans. Figure 1 shows the relatedness of various vertebrate species, indicating which have vocal learning and entrainment abilities.Table 1.


Searching for the origins of musicality across species.

Hoeschele M, Merchant H, Kikuchi Y, Hattori Y, ten Cate C - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2015)

Species with vocal learning and entrainment abilities and their relationship in a phylogenetic tree.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321135&req=5

RSTB20140094F1: Species with vocal learning and entrainment abilities and their relationship in a phylogenetic tree.
Mentions: The two best known features of musicality found in distantly related species are vocal learning and entrainment (see glossary, table 1). There are suggestions that the two abilities are related [94]. To date, the species that have been shown to exhibit both vocal learning and entrainment are distantly related to humans. Figure 1 shows the relatedness of various vertebrate species, indicating which have vocal learning and entrainment abilities.Table 1.

Bottom Line: In the introduction to this theme issue, Honing et al. suggest that the origins of musicality--the capacity that makes it possible for us to perceive, appreciate and produce music--can be pursued productively by searching for components of musicality in other species.Recent studies have highlighted that the behavioural relevance of stimuli to animals and the relation of experimental procedures to their natural behaviour can have a large impact on the type of results that can be obtained for a given species.These two approaches are both vital in the comparative study of musicality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cognitive Biology, Vienna, Austria marisa.hoeschele@univie.ac.at.

ABSTRACT
In the introduction to this theme issue, Honing et al. suggest that the origins of musicality--the capacity that makes it possible for us to perceive, appreciate and produce music--can be pursued productively by searching for components of musicality in other species. Recent studies have highlighted that the behavioural relevance of stimuli to animals and the relation of experimental procedures to their natural behaviour can have a large impact on the type of results that can be obtained for a given species. Through reviewing laboratory findings on animal auditory perception and behaviour, as well as relevant findings on natural behaviour, we provide evidence that both traditional laboratory studies and studies relating to natural behaviour are needed to answer the problem of musicality. Traditional laboratory studies use synthetic stimuli that provide more control than more naturalistic studies, and are in many ways suitable to test the perceptual abilities of animals. However, naturalistic studies are essential to inform us as to what might constitute relevant stimuli and parameters to test with laboratory studies, or why we may or may not expect certain stimulus manipulations to be relevant. These two approaches are both vital in the comparative study of musicality.

Show MeSH