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Primary angiosarcoma of urinary bladder: 13th reported patient.

Bahouth Z, Masarwa I, Halachmi S, Nativ O - Case Rep Oncol Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Bone scan and CT-U showed metastasis to spine.The patient was treated with palliative radiotherapy for back pain due to metastasis, and he refused chemotherapy.The patient died 3 months after his initial diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bnai-Zion Medical Center, 3339313 Haifa, Israel ; Faculty of Medicine, Technion Institute of Technology, 3200003 Haifa, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Angiosarcoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely rare and poorly characterized tumor. We are presenting the 13th reported patient who was an 89-year-old man initially presented with massive hematuria. His past medical history included external-beam radiation for prostate cancer 12 years ago. His PSA was 0.26 ng/dL. His CT-Urography demonstrated a highly vascular mass originating from the bladder base. The mass was partially resected, transurethrally. The pathology was consistent with primary angiosarcoma of the urinary bladder. Bone scan and CT-U showed metastasis to spine. The patient was treated with palliative radiotherapy for back pain due to metastasis, and he refused chemotherapy. The patient died 3 months after his initial diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histopathology and immunohistochemistry. (a) Typical appearance of anastomosing vascular channels as seen with H&E. (b) Tumor cells stain positive for CD34. (c) Tumor cells stain positive for CD31. (d) Tumor cells do not stain for cytokeratin.
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fig2: Histopathology and immunohistochemistry. (a) Typical appearance of anastomosing vascular channels as seen with H&E. (b) Tumor cells stain positive for CD34. (c) Tumor cells stain positive for CD31. (d) Tumor cells do not stain for cytokeratin.

Mentions: Macroscopically, the specimen was 6 × 5 × 4 cm3 of grey tissue and blood clots. Microscopically, the tissue diagnosis was consistent with primary angiosarcoma of urinary bladder invading muscularis layer, with anastomosing vascular channels (Figure 2(a)). The tumor strongly stained for CD31 and CD34 and focally for fVIII (Figures 2(b) and 2(c)), three markers for endothelial cells, and was negative for Keratin P63, a marker of epithelial cells (Figure 2(d)). No prostatic tissue was found in the specimen.


Primary angiosarcoma of urinary bladder: 13th reported patient.

Bahouth Z, Masarwa I, Halachmi S, Nativ O - Case Rep Oncol Med (2015)

Histopathology and immunohistochemistry. (a) Typical appearance of anastomosing vascular channels as seen with H&E. (b) Tumor cells stain positive for CD34. (c) Tumor cells stain positive for CD31. (d) Tumor cells do not stain for cytokeratin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321076&req=5

fig2: Histopathology and immunohistochemistry. (a) Typical appearance of anastomosing vascular channels as seen with H&E. (b) Tumor cells stain positive for CD34. (c) Tumor cells stain positive for CD31. (d) Tumor cells do not stain for cytokeratin.
Mentions: Macroscopically, the specimen was 6 × 5 × 4 cm3 of grey tissue and blood clots. Microscopically, the tissue diagnosis was consistent with primary angiosarcoma of urinary bladder invading muscularis layer, with anastomosing vascular channels (Figure 2(a)). The tumor strongly stained for CD31 and CD34 and focally for fVIII (Figures 2(b) and 2(c)), three markers for endothelial cells, and was negative for Keratin P63, a marker of epithelial cells (Figure 2(d)). No prostatic tissue was found in the specimen.

Bottom Line: Bone scan and CT-U showed metastasis to spine.The patient was treated with palliative radiotherapy for back pain due to metastasis, and he refused chemotherapy.The patient died 3 months after his initial diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bnai-Zion Medical Center, 3339313 Haifa, Israel ; Faculty of Medicine, Technion Institute of Technology, 3200003 Haifa, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Angiosarcoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely rare and poorly characterized tumor. We are presenting the 13th reported patient who was an 89-year-old man initially presented with massive hematuria. His past medical history included external-beam radiation for prostate cancer 12 years ago. His PSA was 0.26 ng/dL. His CT-Urography demonstrated a highly vascular mass originating from the bladder base. The mass was partially resected, transurethrally. The pathology was consistent with primary angiosarcoma of the urinary bladder. Bone scan and CT-U showed metastasis to spine. The patient was treated with palliative radiotherapy for back pain due to metastasis, and he refused chemotherapy. The patient died 3 months after his initial diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus