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Stimulation of colonic motility by oral PEG electrolyte bowel preparation assessed by MRI: comparison of split vs single dose.

Marciani L, Garsed KC, Hoad CL, Fields A, Fordham I, Pritchard SE, Placidi E, Murray K, Chaddock G, Costigan C, Lam C, Jalanka-Tuovinen J, De Vos WM, Gowland PA, Spiller RC - Neurogastroenterol. Motil. (2014)

Bottom Line: Ingestion of 1 and 2 L PEG electrolyte solution caused a rapid increase in the small bowel and colonic volumes and a robust rise in colonic motility.The increase in both volumes and motility was dose dependent.Such a challenge, being well-tolerated, could be a useful way of assessing colonic motility in future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre and NIHR Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

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Ascending colon chyme longitudinal relaxation time T1 for the group of 11 healthy volunteers who took the split 2 × 1 L dose of PEG electrolyte and the separate group of 12 healthy volunteers who took the single 2 L dose of PEG electrolyte. Values are mean relaxation time T1 (in seconds) ±SEM.
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fig08: Ascending colon chyme longitudinal relaxation time T1 for the group of 11 healthy volunteers who took the split 2 × 1 L dose of PEG electrolyte and the separate group of 12 healthy volunteers who took the single 2 L dose of PEG electrolyte. Values are mean relaxation time T1 (in seconds) ±SEM.

Mentions: The baseline value of ascending colon chyme T1 for the split dose was significantly higher than of the single dose group, p = 0.0496 (Fig.8). The T1 significantly increased fourfold from baseline values upon dosing for both the split dose (p < 0.0004) and the single dose (p < 0.0005). The split dose T1 values remained higher than for the single dose throughout the study day, but the difference was not significant (Table S3). The T1 values returned to baseline values the following day.


Stimulation of colonic motility by oral PEG electrolyte bowel preparation assessed by MRI: comparison of split vs single dose.

Marciani L, Garsed KC, Hoad CL, Fields A, Fordham I, Pritchard SE, Placidi E, Murray K, Chaddock G, Costigan C, Lam C, Jalanka-Tuovinen J, De Vos WM, Gowland PA, Spiller RC - Neurogastroenterol. Motil. (2014)

Ascending colon chyme longitudinal relaxation time T1 for the group of 11 healthy volunteers who took the split 2 × 1 L dose of PEG electrolyte and the separate group of 12 healthy volunteers who took the single 2 L dose of PEG electrolyte. Values are mean relaxation time T1 (in seconds) ±SEM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321061&req=5

fig08: Ascending colon chyme longitudinal relaxation time T1 for the group of 11 healthy volunteers who took the split 2 × 1 L dose of PEG electrolyte and the separate group of 12 healthy volunteers who took the single 2 L dose of PEG electrolyte. Values are mean relaxation time T1 (in seconds) ±SEM.
Mentions: The baseline value of ascending colon chyme T1 for the split dose was significantly higher than of the single dose group, p = 0.0496 (Fig.8). The T1 significantly increased fourfold from baseline values upon dosing for both the split dose (p < 0.0004) and the single dose (p < 0.0005). The split dose T1 values remained higher than for the single dose throughout the study day, but the difference was not significant (Table S3). The T1 values returned to baseline values the following day.

Bottom Line: Ingestion of 1 and 2 L PEG electrolyte solution caused a rapid increase in the small bowel and colonic volumes and a robust rise in colonic motility.The increase in both volumes and motility was dose dependent.Such a challenge, being well-tolerated, could be a useful way of assessing colonic motility in future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre and NIHR Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus