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Lack of dystrophin results in abnormal cerebral diffusion and perfusion in vivo.

Goodnough CL, Gao Y, Li X, Qutaish MQ, Goodnough LH, Molter J, Wilson D, Flask CA, Yu X - Neuroimage (2014)

Bottom Line: There was also an 18% decrease in cerebral perfusion in 10-month-old mdx mice as compared to WT, which was associated with enhanced arteriogenesis.The observation of decreased perfusion in the setting of enhanced arteriogenesis may be caused by an increase of intracranial pressure from cerebral edema.This study demonstrates the defects in water handling at the BBB and consequently, abnormal perfusion associated with the absence of dystrophin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the classic model and the Pell model. a and b. Simulated Fc and Fp, and CBFc/CBFP at 7 T, respectively. c and d. Simulated Fc and Fp, and CBFc/CBFP at 9.4 T, respectively. Solid lines in a and c represent the classic model, while dotted lines represent the Pell model. Black, red, and blue represent tissue T1 of 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 s, respectively.
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Figure 6: Comparison of the classic model and the Pell model. a and b. Simulated Fc and Fp, and CBFc/CBFP at 7 T, respectively. c and d. Simulated Fc and Fp, and CBFc/CBFP at 9.4 T, respectively. Solid lines in a and c represent the classic model, while dotted lines represent the Pell model. Black, red, and blue represent tissue T1 of 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 s, respectively.

Mentions: Using a transit time of 50 ms (Thomas, 2005), a blood T1 of 2.2 and 2.4 s at 7 T and 9.4 T, respectively (ex vivo measurement) (Dobre et al., 2007), and a tissue T1 of 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 s, respectively, the simulated differences between the two models with CBF ranging from 100 to 400 mL/min/100 g are shown in Fig. 6. These results suggest that at a field strength of 7 T, the difference between the classic model and the Pell model was <3% when tissue T1 was 1.8 s. However, the classic model overestimated CBF by 12% to 16% when tissue T1 was 1.4 s (Figs. 6a and b). In our current study, measured tissue T1 was ~ 1.7 s. Hence, the calculated CBF difference should be within 8% compared to the Pell model. At 9.4 T, there could be an up to 12% overestimation by the classic model (Figs. 6c and d).


Lack of dystrophin results in abnormal cerebral diffusion and perfusion in vivo.

Goodnough CL, Gao Y, Li X, Qutaish MQ, Goodnough LH, Molter J, Wilson D, Flask CA, Yu X - Neuroimage (2014)

Comparison of the classic model and the Pell model. a and b. Simulated Fc and Fp, and CBFc/CBFP at 7 T, respectively. c and d. Simulated Fc and Fp, and CBFc/CBFP at 9.4 T, respectively. Solid lines in a and c represent the classic model, while dotted lines represent the Pell model. Black, red, and blue represent tissue T1 of 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 s, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320943&req=5

Figure 6: Comparison of the classic model and the Pell model. a and b. Simulated Fc and Fp, and CBFc/CBFP at 7 T, respectively. c and d. Simulated Fc and Fp, and CBFc/CBFP at 9.4 T, respectively. Solid lines in a and c represent the classic model, while dotted lines represent the Pell model. Black, red, and blue represent tissue T1 of 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 s, respectively.
Mentions: Using a transit time of 50 ms (Thomas, 2005), a blood T1 of 2.2 and 2.4 s at 7 T and 9.4 T, respectively (ex vivo measurement) (Dobre et al., 2007), and a tissue T1 of 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 s, respectively, the simulated differences between the two models with CBF ranging from 100 to 400 mL/min/100 g are shown in Fig. 6. These results suggest that at a field strength of 7 T, the difference between the classic model and the Pell model was <3% when tissue T1 was 1.8 s. However, the classic model overestimated CBF by 12% to 16% when tissue T1 was 1.4 s (Figs. 6a and b). In our current study, measured tissue T1 was ~ 1.7 s. Hence, the calculated CBF difference should be within 8% compared to the Pell model. At 9.4 T, there could be an up to 12% overestimation by the classic model (Figs. 6c and d).

Bottom Line: There was also an 18% decrease in cerebral perfusion in 10-month-old mdx mice as compared to WT, which was associated with enhanced arteriogenesis.The observation of decreased perfusion in the setting of enhanced arteriogenesis may be caused by an increase of intracranial pressure from cerebral edema.This study demonstrates the defects in water handling at the BBB and consequently, abnormal perfusion associated with the absence of dystrophin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus