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Determinants of vitamin d levels in children and adolescents with down syndrome.

Stagi S, Lapi E, Romano S, Bargiacchi S, Brambilla A, Giglio S, Seminara S, de Martino M - Int J Endocrinol (2015)

Bottom Line: DS subjects showed reduced 25(OH)D levels compared to controls (P < 0.0001), in particular DS subjects with obesity (P < 0.05) and autoimmune diseases history (P < 0.005).After cholecalciferol supplementation, 25(OH)D levels were significantly ameliorated (P < 0.05), even if reduced compared to controls (P < 0.0001), in particular in DS subjects with obesity (P < 0.05) and autoimmune diseases (P < 0.001).Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Sciences Department, Anna Meyer Children's University Hospital, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 24, 50139 Florence, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Background. Poor studies have evaluated 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) levels in Down syndrome (DS). Objective. To assess in DS subjects serum 25(OH)D value, to identify risk factors for vitamin D deficiency, and to evaluate whether a normal 25(OH)D value can be restored with a 400 I.U. daily supplement of cholecalciferol in respect to controls. Methods. We have longitudinally evaluated 31 DS patients (aged 4.5-18.9 years old) and 99 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In these subjects, we analysed calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25(OH)D concentrations, and calcium and 25(OH)D dietary intakes, and we quantified outdoor exposure. After 12.3 months (range 8.1-14.7 months) of 25(OH)D supplementation, we reevaluated these subjects. Results. DS subjects showed reduced 25(OH)D levels compared to controls (P < 0.0001), in particular DS subjects with obesity (P < 0.05) and autoimmune diseases history (P < 0.005). PTH levels were significantly higher in DS subjects than controls (P < 0.0001). After cholecalciferol supplementation, 25(OH)D levels were significantly ameliorated (P < 0.05), even if reduced compared to controls (P < 0.0001), in particular in DS subjects with obesity (P < 0.05) and autoimmune diseases (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Hypovitaminosis D is very frequent in DS subjects, in particular in presence of obesity and autoimmune diseases. In these subjects, there could be a need for higher cholecalciferol supplementation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

25(OH)D levels (ng/mL) at cross-sectional (a) and longitudinal (b) evaluation in patients with Down syndrome and controls. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.005; ***P < 0.001.
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fig1: 25(OH)D levels (ng/mL) at cross-sectional (a) and longitudinal (b) evaluation in patients with Down syndrome and controls. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.005; ***P < 0.001.

Mentions: However, for evaluating the 25(OH)D levels, we show that the DS subjects had significantly reduced 25(OH)D levels compared with the controls (14.34 ± 8.31 ng/mL versus 27.04 ± 7.47; P < 0.0001) (Figure 1(a)). In the DS subjects, 25(OH)D levels were not different between males (14.85 ± 8.25 ng/mL) and females (13.75 ± 8.70), children (14.26 ± 8.71 ng/mL), and adolescents (14.45 ± 8.15); we showed significant statistical differences between DS individuals with normal weights (16.93 ± 8.71 ng/mL) and those who were obese (10.20 ± 5.13; P < 0.05) (Figure 2(a)) and DS individuals without (19.00 ± 8.06 ng/mL) and with (10.35 ± 6.57 ng/mL; P < 0.005) a history of autoimmune diseases (Figure 3(a)).


Determinants of vitamin d levels in children and adolescents with down syndrome.

Stagi S, Lapi E, Romano S, Bargiacchi S, Brambilla A, Giglio S, Seminara S, de Martino M - Int J Endocrinol (2015)

25(OH)D levels (ng/mL) at cross-sectional (a) and longitudinal (b) evaluation in patients with Down syndrome and controls. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.005; ***P < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320854&req=5

fig1: 25(OH)D levels (ng/mL) at cross-sectional (a) and longitudinal (b) evaluation in patients with Down syndrome and controls. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.005; ***P < 0.001.
Mentions: However, for evaluating the 25(OH)D levels, we show that the DS subjects had significantly reduced 25(OH)D levels compared with the controls (14.34 ± 8.31 ng/mL versus 27.04 ± 7.47; P < 0.0001) (Figure 1(a)). In the DS subjects, 25(OH)D levels were not different between males (14.85 ± 8.25 ng/mL) and females (13.75 ± 8.70), children (14.26 ± 8.71 ng/mL), and adolescents (14.45 ± 8.15); we showed significant statistical differences between DS individuals with normal weights (16.93 ± 8.71 ng/mL) and those who were obese (10.20 ± 5.13; P < 0.05) (Figure 2(a)) and DS individuals without (19.00 ± 8.06 ng/mL) and with (10.35 ± 6.57 ng/mL; P < 0.005) a history of autoimmune diseases (Figure 3(a)).

Bottom Line: DS subjects showed reduced 25(OH)D levels compared to controls (P < 0.0001), in particular DS subjects with obesity (P < 0.05) and autoimmune diseases history (P < 0.005).After cholecalciferol supplementation, 25(OH)D levels were significantly ameliorated (P < 0.05), even if reduced compared to controls (P < 0.0001), in particular in DS subjects with obesity (P < 0.05) and autoimmune diseases (P < 0.001).Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Sciences Department, Anna Meyer Children's University Hospital, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 24, 50139 Florence, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Background. Poor studies have evaluated 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) levels in Down syndrome (DS). Objective. To assess in DS subjects serum 25(OH)D value, to identify risk factors for vitamin D deficiency, and to evaluate whether a normal 25(OH)D value can be restored with a 400 I.U. daily supplement of cholecalciferol in respect to controls. Methods. We have longitudinally evaluated 31 DS patients (aged 4.5-18.9 years old) and 99 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In these subjects, we analysed calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25(OH)D concentrations, and calcium and 25(OH)D dietary intakes, and we quantified outdoor exposure. After 12.3 months (range 8.1-14.7 months) of 25(OH)D supplementation, we reevaluated these subjects. Results. DS subjects showed reduced 25(OH)D levels compared to controls (P < 0.0001), in particular DS subjects with obesity (P < 0.05) and autoimmune diseases history (P < 0.005). PTH levels were significantly higher in DS subjects than controls (P < 0.0001). After cholecalciferol supplementation, 25(OH)D levels were significantly ameliorated (P < 0.05), even if reduced compared to controls (P < 0.0001), in particular in DS subjects with obesity (P < 0.05) and autoimmune diseases (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Hypovitaminosis D is very frequent in DS subjects, in particular in presence of obesity and autoimmune diseases. In these subjects, there could be a need for higher cholecalciferol supplementation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus