Limits...
Geographic tongue and fissured tongue in 348 patients with psoriasis: correlation with disease severity.

Picciani BL, Souza TT, Santos Vde C, Domingos TA, Carneiro S, Avelleira JC, Azulay DR, Pinto JM, Dias EP - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: Three hundred and forty-eight PG and 348 HC were selected.The FT and GT were more frequent in PG than in HC.The presence of GT and FT is higher in PG than in the HC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Faculdade de Medicina, Departamento de Patologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Marques de Parana 303, 4° Andar, 24033-900 Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Geographic tongue (GT) and fissured tongue (FT) are the more frequent oral lesions in patients with psoriasis. The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of GT/FT between psoriasis group (PG) and healthy controls (HC) and investigate the correlation between GT/FT and psoriasis severity using the PASI and age of psoriasis onset. Three hundred and forty-eight PG and 348 HC were selected. According to the age of psoriasis onset, the individuals were classified as having early psoriasis and late psoriasis. The severity of vulgaris psoriasis was determined according to PASI. A follow-up was conducted in patients with psoriasis vulgaris (PV) with GT to evaluate the progression of oral and cutaneous lesions. The FT and GT were more frequent in PG than in HC. The incidence of GT was higher in patients with early psoriasis and that of FT in late-psoriasis. There is association between psoriasis intensity and GT; and a higher monthly decrease of PASI score in patients without GT. The presence of GT and FT is higher in PG than in the HC. GT is associated with disease severity and may be a marker of the psoriasis severity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fissured tongue and geographic tongue. Clinical aspects of fissured tongue (black arrow) and geographic tongue (blue arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320844&req=5

fig1: Fissured tongue and geographic tongue. Clinical aspects of fissured tongue (black arrow) and geographic tongue (blue arrow).

Mentions: The PG group included 348 patients (177 (51%) women; 181 (52%) Caucasians; average age, 51 ± 15 years; range, 18–90 years). The HC group included 348 individuals (195 (55%) women; 232 (66%) Caucasians; average age, 46 ± 19 years; range, 18–90 years). Psoriasis vulgaris (81%) was the most common clinical type observed in this cohort. The mean age at diagnosis was 38 ± 16.3 years (range, 6–78 years). Early-onset psoriasis was observed in 131 (38%) patients. Totally, 184 (53%) patients were receiving systemic therapy, 125 (36%) were receiving topical treatment, 25 (7%) were receiving phototherapy (narrow-band ultraviolet B), and 14 (4%) were not receiving any therapy. The severity of chronic plaque-type psoriasis as assessed by PASI scores was mild in 157 (55%) patients, moderate in 43 (15%), and severe in 84 (30%). The GT (Figure 1) was more frequent in PG than in HC, with 43 (12%) and 10 (3%) patients, respectively (P = 0.002; OR = 4.76; 95% CI: 2.30–10.8; Table 1). The FT (Figure 1) was detected more frequently in PG than HC, with 125 (36%) and 70 (20%) patients (P ≤ 0.001; OR = 3.45; 95% CI: 2.44–4.91; Table 1). The incidence of GT (65%) was higher in patients with early-onset psoriasis and FT (58%) had higher frequency in patients with late psoriasis (Table 2). The Kruskal-Wallis test indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups with regard to the age of psoriasis onset (P = 0.004). The box plot shows the distribution of the age of psoriasis onset in the groups studied (Figure 2). With regard to the severity of psoriasis vulgaris, the PASI scores were mild in 88 (59%) PV, 61 (61%) FT, and 8 (22%) GT; moderate in 23 (16%) PV, 13 (13%) FT, and 7 (20%) GT; and severe in 37 (25%) PV, 26 (26%) FT, and 21 (58%) GT. A Kruskal-Wallis test indicated a statistically significant difference among the groups in relation to the PASI score (P ≤ 0.001). The Mann-Whitney test showed a statistically significant association (P < 0.001) between psoriasis severity and GT occurrence (Figure 3). The considered patients with severe psoriasis vulgaris, as assessed by PASI, with GT showed proportional rates that were twofold higher than those shown by PV without GT (25% versus 58%, resp.). The box plot shows the distribution of PASI scores in the studied groups (Figure 3). Considering the 36 patients with GT and psoriasis vulgaris, 22 (61%) returned for further appointments, while 11 (50%) had no oral lesions. The average monthly PASI score in three months was −8.7 points (standard derivation 9.8 points) in patients without GT and 0.7 points (standard derivation 4.1 points) in patients with GT (t test, P = 0.014; Table 3). The average monthly PASI score in six months was −11.6 points (standard derivation 9.1 points) in patients without GT and 1.1 points (standard derivation 8.7 points) in patients with GT (t test, P = 0.0003; Table 3).


Geographic tongue and fissured tongue in 348 patients with psoriasis: correlation with disease severity.

Picciani BL, Souza TT, Santos Vde C, Domingos TA, Carneiro S, Avelleira JC, Azulay DR, Pinto JM, Dias EP - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Fissured tongue and geographic tongue. Clinical aspects of fissured tongue (black arrow) and geographic tongue (blue arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320844&req=5

fig1: Fissured tongue and geographic tongue. Clinical aspects of fissured tongue (black arrow) and geographic tongue (blue arrow).
Mentions: The PG group included 348 patients (177 (51%) women; 181 (52%) Caucasians; average age, 51 ± 15 years; range, 18–90 years). The HC group included 348 individuals (195 (55%) women; 232 (66%) Caucasians; average age, 46 ± 19 years; range, 18–90 years). Psoriasis vulgaris (81%) was the most common clinical type observed in this cohort. The mean age at diagnosis was 38 ± 16.3 years (range, 6–78 years). Early-onset psoriasis was observed in 131 (38%) patients. Totally, 184 (53%) patients were receiving systemic therapy, 125 (36%) were receiving topical treatment, 25 (7%) were receiving phototherapy (narrow-band ultraviolet B), and 14 (4%) were not receiving any therapy. The severity of chronic plaque-type psoriasis as assessed by PASI scores was mild in 157 (55%) patients, moderate in 43 (15%), and severe in 84 (30%). The GT (Figure 1) was more frequent in PG than in HC, with 43 (12%) and 10 (3%) patients, respectively (P = 0.002; OR = 4.76; 95% CI: 2.30–10.8; Table 1). The FT (Figure 1) was detected more frequently in PG than HC, with 125 (36%) and 70 (20%) patients (P ≤ 0.001; OR = 3.45; 95% CI: 2.44–4.91; Table 1). The incidence of GT (65%) was higher in patients with early-onset psoriasis and FT (58%) had higher frequency in patients with late psoriasis (Table 2). The Kruskal-Wallis test indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups with regard to the age of psoriasis onset (P = 0.004). The box plot shows the distribution of the age of psoriasis onset in the groups studied (Figure 2). With regard to the severity of psoriasis vulgaris, the PASI scores were mild in 88 (59%) PV, 61 (61%) FT, and 8 (22%) GT; moderate in 23 (16%) PV, 13 (13%) FT, and 7 (20%) GT; and severe in 37 (25%) PV, 26 (26%) FT, and 21 (58%) GT. A Kruskal-Wallis test indicated a statistically significant difference among the groups in relation to the PASI score (P ≤ 0.001). The Mann-Whitney test showed a statistically significant association (P < 0.001) between psoriasis severity and GT occurrence (Figure 3). The considered patients with severe psoriasis vulgaris, as assessed by PASI, with GT showed proportional rates that were twofold higher than those shown by PV without GT (25% versus 58%, resp.). The box plot shows the distribution of PASI scores in the studied groups (Figure 3). Considering the 36 patients with GT and psoriasis vulgaris, 22 (61%) returned for further appointments, while 11 (50%) had no oral lesions. The average monthly PASI score in three months was −8.7 points (standard derivation 9.8 points) in patients without GT and 0.7 points (standard derivation 4.1 points) in patients with GT (t test, P = 0.014; Table 3). The average monthly PASI score in six months was −11.6 points (standard derivation 9.1 points) in patients without GT and 1.1 points (standard derivation 8.7 points) in patients with GT (t test, P = 0.0003; Table 3).

Bottom Line: Three hundred and forty-eight PG and 348 HC were selected.The FT and GT were more frequent in PG than in HC.The presence of GT and FT is higher in PG than in the HC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Faculdade de Medicina, Departamento de Patologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Marques de Parana 303, 4° Andar, 24033-900 Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Geographic tongue (GT) and fissured tongue (FT) are the more frequent oral lesions in patients with psoriasis. The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of GT/FT between psoriasis group (PG) and healthy controls (HC) and investigate the correlation between GT/FT and psoriasis severity using the PASI and age of psoriasis onset. Three hundred and forty-eight PG and 348 HC were selected. According to the age of psoriasis onset, the individuals were classified as having early psoriasis and late psoriasis. The severity of vulgaris psoriasis was determined according to PASI. A follow-up was conducted in patients with psoriasis vulgaris (PV) with GT to evaluate the progression of oral and cutaneous lesions. The FT and GT were more frequent in PG than in HC. The incidence of GT was higher in patients with early psoriasis and that of FT in late-psoriasis. There is association between psoriasis intensity and GT; and a higher monthly decrease of PASI score in patients without GT. The presence of GT and FT is higher in PG than in the HC. GT is associated with disease severity and may be a marker of the psoriasis severity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus