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Dynamics of natural populations of the dertitivorous mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray) (Hydrobiidae) in two interconnected Lakes differing in trophic state.

Dorgelo J, van der Geest HG, Hunting ER - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: The size distributions and reproductive output of the snail populations was analyzed monthly by field surveys spanning 3 years, and in a controlled microcosm experiment to evaluate the reproductive potential under laboratory conditions.Snails in the meso-oligotrophic lake showed reduced growth and a smaller size compared to snails in the eutrophic lake.However, the numbers of eggs and nearly-neonates per adult snail did not differ significantly between the two populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 94248, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Here we investigate the allocation of resources between growth and reproduction by surveying the dynamics of natural populations of the aquatic detritivorous mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum from two interconnected lakes that differ in trophic state. The size distributions and reproductive output of the snail populations was analyzed monthly by field surveys spanning 3 years, and in a controlled microcosm experiment to evaluate the reproductive potential under laboratory conditions. Snails in the meso-oligotrophic lake showed reduced growth and a smaller size compared to snails in the eutrophic lake. However, the numbers of eggs and nearly-neonates per adult snail did not differ significantly between the two populations. It is speculated that P. antipodarum populations living under meso-oligotrophic conditions may consistently invest more internal energy in reproduction at the expense of growth and that food quantity may be an important driver for macro-invertebrate resource allocation in detrital food webs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Development of the populations of in the microcosms, according to the six size classes (in mm). 1. Snails, sediment and water from meso-olgotrophic Lake I. 2. Snails, sediment and water from eutrophic Lake II.
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Fig5: Development of the populations of in the microcosms, according to the six size classes (in mm). 1. Snails, sediment and water from meso-olgotrophic Lake I. 2. Snails, sediment and water from eutrophic Lake II.

Mentions: Incubation of both populations derived from both the meso-oligotrophic and the eutrophic lake in microcosms supplemented with detritus and excess of lettuce showed that the reproductive output and population development in both lake environments was potentially similar in terms of size and reproductive output, i.e. number of individuals (Figure 5). During the first phase of the experiment (first two months), growth from the initially present 1.75 mm snails into 2.00 mm snails was observed. During the second phase (3 months onwards), reproduction (appearance of 0.60 mm snails) and growth to larger size classes were successful. When the numbers of 0.60 mm snails leveled off (at month 7), the numbers of adult snails still increased. The representation of 1.00 mm snails was very low, indicating a fast growth into the 1.25 mm size class. After eight months the snail densities were approximately 8,000 and 7,900 individuals/m2 in microcosm 1 and 2, respectively.Figure 5


Dynamics of natural populations of the dertitivorous mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray) (Hydrobiidae) in two interconnected Lakes differing in trophic state.

Dorgelo J, van der Geest HG, Hunting ER - Springerplus (2014)

Development of the populations of in the microcosms, according to the six size classes (in mm). 1. Snails, sediment and water from meso-olgotrophic Lake I. 2. Snails, sediment and water from eutrophic Lake II.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320230&req=5

Fig5: Development of the populations of in the microcosms, according to the six size classes (in mm). 1. Snails, sediment and water from meso-olgotrophic Lake I. 2. Snails, sediment and water from eutrophic Lake II.
Mentions: Incubation of both populations derived from both the meso-oligotrophic and the eutrophic lake in microcosms supplemented with detritus and excess of lettuce showed that the reproductive output and population development in both lake environments was potentially similar in terms of size and reproductive output, i.e. number of individuals (Figure 5). During the first phase of the experiment (first two months), growth from the initially present 1.75 mm snails into 2.00 mm snails was observed. During the second phase (3 months onwards), reproduction (appearance of 0.60 mm snails) and growth to larger size classes were successful. When the numbers of 0.60 mm snails leveled off (at month 7), the numbers of adult snails still increased. The representation of 1.00 mm snails was very low, indicating a fast growth into the 1.25 mm size class. After eight months the snail densities were approximately 8,000 and 7,900 individuals/m2 in microcosm 1 and 2, respectively.Figure 5

Bottom Line: The size distributions and reproductive output of the snail populations was analyzed monthly by field surveys spanning 3 years, and in a controlled microcosm experiment to evaluate the reproductive potential under laboratory conditions.Snails in the meso-oligotrophic lake showed reduced growth and a smaller size compared to snails in the eutrophic lake.However, the numbers of eggs and nearly-neonates per adult snail did not differ significantly between the two populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 94248, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Here we investigate the allocation of resources between growth and reproduction by surveying the dynamics of natural populations of the aquatic detritivorous mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum from two interconnected lakes that differ in trophic state. The size distributions and reproductive output of the snail populations was analyzed monthly by field surveys spanning 3 years, and in a controlled microcosm experiment to evaluate the reproductive potential under laboratory conditions. Snails in the meso-oligotrophic lake showed reduced growth and a smaller size compared to snails in the eutrophic lake. However, the numbers of eggs and nearly-neonates per adult snail did not differ significantly between the two populations. It is speculated that P. antipodarum populations living under meso-oligotrophic conditions may consistently invest more internal energy in reproduction at the expense of growth and that food quantity may be an important driver for macro-invertebrate resource allocation in detrital food webs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus