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Race is not a factor in overall survival in patients with triple negative breast cancer: a retrospective review.

Starlard-Davenport A, Glover-Collins K, Mahkoul I, Hutchins L, Westbrook K, Korourian S, Enoch K, Preston M, Jackson SN, Klimberg VS, Henry-Tillman R - Springerplus (2013)

Bottom Line: Rates of recurrence and mortality were not significantly different between AA and Caucasian TNBC patients.After controlling for patient variables, race was not significantly associated with OS (HR = 1.24; 95% CI, 0.32 to 5.08; P = 0.74) when comparing AA to Caucasian patients.Our study suggests that race does not have an effect on overall survival in African American and Caucasian women diagnosed with TNBC in Arkansas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 USA.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to determine if race is a factor on overall survival when stage at diagnosis is compared. In this study, a total of 93 women with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) were evaluated for survival outcomes after diagnosis between the year 2000 through 2010. Thirty-five patients (38%) were African American (AA), and 58 patients (62%) were Caucasian. Overall survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared between groups using the log-rank test. Student's t-test was used to calculate differences in cancer recurrence and mortality rates by stage and race. Cox proportional hazards ratios were used to determine the association of patient and variables with clinical outcome. Of women diagnosed with stage 1 breast cancer, the overall survival rates for AAs was 100% compared to Caucasians at 94% (95% CI, 0.003 to 19; P = 0.5). For women with stage 2 breast cancer, overall survival for AA women was 85% and for Caucasian women was 86% (HR = 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.6; P = 0.73). For advanced stages (stage 3 and 4), survival for AA women were 78% and 40% for Caucasian women (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.2 to 1.98; P = 0.43). Rates of recurrence and mortality were not significantly different between AA and Caucasian TNBC patients. After controlling for patient variables, race was not significantly associated with OS (HR = 1.24; 95% CI, 0.32 to 5.08; P = 0.74) when comparing AA to Caucasian patients. Our study suggests that race does not have an effect on overall survival in African American and Caucasian women diagnosed with TNBC in Arkansas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall survival (OS) months after diagnosis by race and/or stage of TNBC. a) OS by race in stage I TNBC, b) OS by race in stage II TNBC, c) OS by race in stage III TNBC d) OS by race in stage IV TNBC e) OS by race in stage I-IV TNBC f) OS by stage of TNBC.
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Fig1: Overall survival (OS) months after diagnosis by race and/or stage of TNBC. a) OS by race in stage I TNBC, b) OS by race in stage II TNBC, c) OS by race in stage III TNBC d) OS by race in stage IV TNBC e) OS by race in stage I-IV TNBC f) OS by stage of TNBC.

Mentions: Of the 93 TNBC patients, 80 patients (86%) were either alive or lost to follow-up at the end of our study. Figure 1a-f illustrate the Kaplan-Meier survival curves with the corresponding log-rank P-values for OS by race and stage of breast disease. Of women diagnosed with stage I breast cancer, the OS rates for AAs was 100% compared to Caucasians at 94% (95% CI, 0.003 to 19; P = 0.54) (Figure 1a). For women with stage II breast cancer, OS for AA women was 85% and for Caucasian women was 86% (HR = 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.6; P = 0.73) (Figure 1b). For advanced stages (stage III and IV), survival for AA women were 78% and 40% for Caucasian women (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.2 to 1.98; P = 0.43) (Figure 1c and d). Collectively, our results demonstrate that differences in OS due to race and overall stage of breast disease between the two races are not statistically significant (Figure 1e and f).Figure 1


Race is not a factor in overall survival in patients with triple negative breast cancer: a retrospective review.

Starlard-Davenport A, Glover-Collins K, Mahkoul I, Hutchins L, Westbrook K, Korourian S, Enoch K, Preston M, Jackson SN, Klimberg VS, Henry-Tillman R - Springerplus (2013)

Overall survival (OS) months after diagnosis by race and/or stage of TNBC. a) OS by race in stage I TNBC, b) OS by race in stage II TNBC, c) OS by race in stage III TNBC d) OS by race in stage IV TNBC e) OS by race in stage I-IV TNBC f) OS by stage of TNBC.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320183&req=5

Fig1: Overall survival (OS) months after diagnosis by race and/or stage of TNBC. a) OS by race in stage I TNBC, b) OS by race in stage II TNBC, c) OS by race in stage III TNBC d) OS by race in stage IV TNBC e) OS by race in stage I-IV TNBC f) OS by stage of TNBC.
Mentions: Of the 93 TNBC patients, 80 patients (86%) were either alive or lost to follow-up at the end of our study. Figure 1a-f illustrate the Kaplan-Meier survival curves with the corresponding log-rank P-values for OS by race and stage of breast disease. Of women diagnosed with stage I breast cancer, the OS rates for AAs was 100% compared to Caucasians at 94% (95% CI, 0.003 to 19; P = 0.54) (Figure 1a). For women with stage II breast cancer, OS for AA women was 85% and for Caucasian women was 86% (HR = 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.6; P = 0.73) (Figure 1b). For advanced stages (stage III and IV), survival for AA women were 78% and 40% for Caucasian women (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.2 to 1.98; P = 0.43) (Figure 1c and d). Collectively, our results demonstrate that differences in OS due to race and overall stage of breast disease between the two races are not statistically significant (Figure 1e and f).Figure 1

Bottom Line: Rates of recurrence and mortality were not significantly different between AA and Caucasian TNBC patients.After controlling for patient variables, race was not significantly associated with OS (HR = 1.24; 95% CI, 0.32 to 5.08; P = 0.74) when comparing AA to Caucasian patients.Our study suggests that race does not have an effect on overall survival in African American and Caucasian women diagnosed with TNBC in Arkansas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 USA.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to determine if race is a factor on overall survival when stage at diagnosis is compared. In this study, a total of 93 women with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) were evaluated for survival outcomes after diagnosis between the year 2000 through 2010. Thirty-five patients (38%) were African American (AA), and 58 patients (62%) were Caucasian. Overall survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared between groups using the log-rank test. Student's t-test was used to calculate differences in cancer recurrence and mortality rates by stage and race. Cox proportional hazards ratios were used to determine the association of patient and variables with clinical outcome. Of women diagnosed with stage 1 breast cancer, the overall survival rates for AAs was 100% compared to Caucasians at 94% (95% CI, 0.003 to 19; P = 0.5). For women with stage 2 breast cancer, overall survival for AA women was 85% and for Caucasian women was 86% (HR = 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.6; P = 0.73). For advanced stages (stage 3 and 4), survival for AA women were 78% and 40% for Caucasian women (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.2 to 1.98; P = 0.43). Rates of recurrence and mortality were not significantly different between AA and Caucasian TNBC patients. After controlling for patient variables, race was not significantly associated with OS (HR = 1.24; 95% CI, 0.32 to 5.08; P = 0.74) when comparing AA to Caucasian patients. Our study suggests that race does not have an effect on overall survival in African American and Caucasian women diagnosed with TNBC in Arkansas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus