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The influence of body mass index and outdoor temperature on the autonomic response to eating in healthy young Japanese women.

Okada M, Kakehashi M - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: A significant decrease in the low-to-high frequency (LF/HF) ratio, which represents the balance between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, was evident in the low BMI group after lunch, indicating parasympathetic system dominance (P = 0.001).In addition, a significant association was found between the LF/HF ratio and outdoor temperature after lunch with a lower BMI (P = 0.002), but this association disappeared with higher BMIs.Autonomic responses to eating showed clear differences according to BMI, indicating that the sensitivity of the autonomic nervous system may change with increases in BMI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food and Dietetics, Hiroshima Bunka Gakuen Two-Year College, 3-5-1 Nagatsukanishi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima, 731-0136 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The influences of body weight and air temperature on the autonomic response to food intake have not been clarified. We measured heart rate variability before and after lunch, as well as the effects of outdoor temperature and increased body mass index (BMI), in healthy young Japanese women.

Methods: We studied 55 healthy young female university students. Heart rate variability was measured before lunch, immediately after lunch, 30 min after lunch, and 1 h after lunch to determine any correlations between heart rate variability, outdoor temperature, and BMI. In addition, multiple regression analysis was performed to elucidate the relationship between heart rate variability and outdoor temperature before and after lunch. A simple slope test was conducted to show the relationship between the low-to-high frequency ratio (1 h after lunch) and outdoor temperature.

Results: Subjects were divided into a low BMI group (range: 16.6-20.3) and a high BMI group (range: 20.4-32.9). The very low frequency component of heart rate variability, an index of thermoregulatory vasomotor control exerted by the sympathetic nervous system, was significantly diminished after lunch in the high BMI group (P < 0.01). A significant decrease in the low-to-high frequency (LF/HF) ratio, which represents the balance between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, was evident in the low BMI group after lunch, indicating parasympathetic system dominance (P = 0.001). In addition, a significant association was found between the LF/HF ratio and outdoor temperature after lunch with a lower BMI (P = 0.002), but this association disappeared with higher BMIs.

Conclusion: Autonomic responses to eating showed clear differences according to BMI, indicating that the sensitivity of the autonomic nervous system may change with increases in BMI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in the low-to-high frequency ratio before and after lunch. (a) High and (b) low BMI groups. Values are expressed as the mean ± standard error. P value was calculated using the Friedman test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare heart rate variability (before vs. after lunch, **P < 0.01).
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Fig2: Changes in the low-to-high frequency ratio before and after lunch. (a) High and (b) low BMI groups. Values are expressed as the mean ± standard error. P value was calculated using the Friedman test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare heart rate variability (before vs. after lunch, **P < 0.01).

Mentions: Table 2a shows heart rate and heart rate variability for all subjects before and after lunch. The heart rate was significantly higher after lunch (P < 0.01). The VLF component was significantly decreased 30 min (P = 0.015) and 1 h (P = 0.008) after lunch, and the LF/HF ratio significantly decreased 1 h after lunch (P = 0.005). In the high BMI group, we found that the VLF component of heart rate variability fell significantly after lunch (P = 0.042), particularly 30 min after eating (P < 0.01, Figure 1a); however, there was no significant change in the LF/HF ratio before and after lunch (Figure 2a). In the low BMI group, we found a less pronounced decrease in the VLF component 1 h after lunch (P < 0.05, Figure 1b), a significant change in the LF/HF ratio (P = 0.001) before and after lunch, and a significantly lower ratio 1 h after lunch (P < 0.01, Figure 2b). There were no significant differences in other heart rate variability components between groups. We found no correlations between other measured variables and BMI in all subjects, although the LF component was weakly correlated with BMI 1 h after lunch (P = 0.023, Table 2b).Table 2


The influence of body mass index and outdoor temperature on the autonomic response to eating in healthy young Japanese women.

Okada M, Kakehashi M - Springerplus (2014)

Changes in the low-to-high frequency ratio before and after lunch. (a) High and (b) low BMI groups. Values are expressed as the mean ± standard error. P value was calculated using the Friedman test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare heart rate variability (before vs. after lunch, **P < 0.01).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320179&req=5

Fig2: Changes in the low-to-high frequency ratio before and after lunch. (a) High and (b) low BMI groups. Values are expressed as the mean ± standard error. P value was calculated using the Friedman test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare heart rate variability (before vs. after lunch, **P < 0.01).
Mentions: Table 2a shows heart rate and heart rate variability for all subjects before and after lunch. The heart rate was significantly higher after lunch (P < 0.01). The VLF component was significantly decreased 30 min (P = 0.015) and 1 h (P = 0.008) after lunch, and the LF/HF ratio significantly decreased 1 h after lunch (P = 0.005). In the high BMI group, we found that the VLF component of heart rate variability fell significantly after lunch (P = 0.042), particularly 30 min after eating (P < 0.01, Figure 1a); however, there was no significant change in the LF/HF ratio before and after lunch (Figure 2a). In the low BMI group, we found a less pronounced decrease in the VLF component 1 h after lunch (P < 0.05, Figure 1b), a significant change in the LF/HF ratio (P = 0.001) before and after lunch, and a significantly lower ratio 1 h after lunch (P < 0.01, Figure 2b). There were no significant differences in other heart rate variability components between groups. We found no correlations between other measured variables and BMI in all subjects, although the LF component was weakly correlated with BMI 1 h after lunch (P = 0.023, Table 2b).Table 2

Bottom Line: A significant decrease in the low-to-high frequency (LF/HF) ratio, which represents the balance between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, was evident in the low BMI group after lunch, indicating parasympathetic system dominance (P = 0.001).In addition, a significant association was found between the LF/HF ratio and outdoor temperature after lunch with a lower BMI (P = 0.002), but this association disappeared with higher BMIs.Autonomic responses to eating showed clear differences according to BMI, indicating that the sensitivity of the autonomic nervous system may change with increases in BMI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food and Dietetics, Hiroshima Bunka Gakuen Two-Year College, 3-5-1 Nagatsukanishi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima, 731-0136 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The influences of body weight and air temperature on the autonomic response to food intake have not been clarified. We measured heart rate variability before and after lunch, as well as the effects of outdoor temperature and increased body mass index (BMI), in healthy young Japanese women.

Methods: We studied 55 healthy young female university students. Heart rate variability was measured before lunch, immediately after lunch, 30 min after lunch, and 1 h after lunch to determine any correlations between heart rate variability, outdoor temperature, and BMI. In addition, multiple regression analysis was performed to elucidate the relationship between heart rate variability and outdoor temperature before and after lunch. A simple slope test was conducted to show the relationship between the low-to-high frequency ratio (1 h after lunch) and outdoor temperature.

Results: Subjects were divided into a low BMI group (range: 16.6-20.3) and a high BMI group (range: 20.4-32.9). The very low frequency component of heart rate variability, an index of thermoregulatory vasomotor control exerted by the sympathetic nervous system, was significantly diminished after lunch in the high BMI group (P < 0.01). A significant decrease in the low-to-high frequency (LF/HF) ratio, which represents the balance between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, was evident in the low BMI group after lunch, indicating parasympathetic system dominance (P = 0.001). In addition, a significant association was found between the LF/HF ratio and outdoor temperature after lunch with a lower BMI (P = 0.002), but this association disappeared with higher BMIs.

Conclusion: Autonomic responses to eating showed clear differences according to BMI, indicating that the sensitivity of the autonomic nervous system may change with increases in BMI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus