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Intellectual style theories: different types of categorizations and their relevance for practitioners.

Nielsen T - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: In the last 25 years, several suggestions as to how theories of styles may be divided into categories and fields of focus have been offered.Theorists and researchers disagree about the criteria on which categorizations should be based, and about which theories fulfill these criteria.Such disagreements are fruitful at a theoretical level, but also have negative consequences for the intended fields of application of the style theories and the associated instruments for measuring styles, because practitioners seeking the theory and instrument best suited for their intended use/application simply cannot find their way through the jungle of disagreements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Oester farimagsgade 2A, DK-1353 Copenhagen K, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
In the 20th century, a large number of psychological theories of intellectual styles were developed. Different reviews mention up to 71 theories of style. In the last 25 years, several suggestions as to how theories of styles may be divided into categories and fields of focus have been offered. Theorists and researchers disagree about the criteria on which categorizations should be based, and about which theories fulfill these criteria. Such disagreements are fruitful at a theoretical level, but also have negative consequences for the intended fields of application of the style theories and the associated instruments for measuring styles, because practitioners seeking the theory and instrument best suited for their intended use/application simply cannot find their way through the jungle of disagreements. The present study seeks to reduce the confusion for practitioners seeking to employ styles, by developing a taxonomy of categorizations of style theories in which all style theories can be placed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A tentative categorization of a number of style theories into five co-ordinate categories. Note. Brackets (…) indicate author initials for the reference works that places the particular style theory in the five categories respectively: J&G = Jonassen and Grabowski (1993), R&R = Rayner and Riding (1997), C = Coffield et al. (2004), S&G = Sternberg and Grigorenko (2001). b) (*) indicates agreement on the placing of a particular theory across the four reference works mentioned above. (bold author initials) indicate that the author through intensive reading of the particular theory found that this is the placing indicated by the theorist originator himself/herself: G = Gregorc (1982, 1998), S = Sternberg (1988, 1997), D&D = Dunn and Dunn (1993), K = Kolb (1984), Vermunt (1998).
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Fig1: A tentative categorization of a number of style theories into five co-ordinate categories. Note. Brackets (…) indicate author initials for the reference works that places the particular style theory in the five categories respectively: J&G = Jonassen and Grabowski (1993), R&R = Rayner and Riding (1997), C = Coffield et al. (2004), S&G = Sternberg and Grigorenko (2001). b) (*) indicates agreement on the placing of a particular theory across the four reference works mentioned above. (bold author initials) indicate that the author through intensive reading of the particular theory found that this is the placing indicated by the theorist originator himself/herself: G = Gregorc (1982, 1998), S = Sternberg (1988, 1997), D&D = Dunn and Dunn (1993), K = Kolb (1984), Vermunt (1998).

Mentions: Based on the agreements and differences in the categorizations in the four review works in Table 1, as well as a number of the theory originators’ own explanations of their theories, an attempt is made to unite all these similarities and discrepancies in categorizations in a new co-ordinate categorization (Figure 1). This new co-ordinate categorization contains five categories, which are mutually co-ordinate and not hierarchically or taxonomically related to one another. The vertical axis, inspired by Sternberg and Grigorenko (2001) and Rayner and Riding (1997), consists of the two classical categories; cognition and personality oriented theories of styles, with the category for learning and teaching oriented theories of styles placed in between these. The placement of the horizontal axis between the cognition and personality oriented styles theories is meant to imply that all of the theories on this axis draw on both of these classical psychological disciplines. The horizontal axis consists of the category learning and teaching oriented theories of styles in the middle, to which is added two categories: to the right, a category for theories on approaches to learning, which are style-like concepts, but strictly speaking not styles. To the left, a category of multi-oriented theories of styles, first suggested by Nielsen (2001). In Figure 1, brackets indicate where originators of a number of the theories as well as where the four reviews in Table 1 would place the given theories, and disagreements on the placement of a theory are illustrated by arrows pointing to alternative category placements according to other authors.Figure 1


Intellectual style theories: different types of categorizations and their relevance for practitioners.

Nielsen T - Springerplus (2014)

A tentative categorization of a number of style theories into five co-ordinate categories. Note. Brackets (…) indicate author initials for the reference works that places the particular style theory in the five categories respectively: J&G = Jonassen and Grabowski (1993), R&R = Rayner and Riding (1997), C = Coffield et al. (2004), S&G = Sternberg and Grigorenko (2001). b) (*) indicates agreement on the placing of a particular theory across the four reference works mentioned above. (bold author initials) indicate that the author through intensive reading of the particular theory found that this is the placing indicated by the theorist originator himself/herself: G = Gregorc (1982, 1998), S = Sternberg (1988, 1997), D&D = Dunn and Dunn (1993), K = Kolb (1984), Vermunt (1998).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320160&req=5

Fig1: A tentative categorization of a number of style theories into five co-ordinate categories. Note. Brackets (…) indicate author initials for the reference works that places the particular style theory in the five categories respectively: J&G = Jonassen and Grabowski (1993), R&R = Rayner and Riding (1997), C = Coffield et al. (2004), S&G = Sternberg and Grigorenko (2001). b) (*) indicates agreement on the placing of a particular theory across the four reference works mentioned above. (bold author initials) indicate that the author through intensive reading of the particular theory found that this is the placing indicated by the theorist originator himself/herself: G = Gregorc (1982, 1998), S = Sternberg (1988, 1997), D&D = Dunn and Dunn (1993), K = Kolb (1984), Vermunt (1998).
Mentions: Based on the agreements and differences in the categorizations in the four review works in Table 1, as well as a number of the theory originators’ own explanations of their theories, an attempt is made to unite all these similarities and discrepancies in categorizations in a new co-ordinate categorization (Figure 1). This new co-ordinate categorization contains five categories, which are mutually co-ordinate and not hierarchically or taxonomically related to one another. The vertical axis, inspired by Sternberg and Grigorenko (2001) and Rayner and Riding (1997), consists of the two classical categories; cognition and personality oriented theories of styles, with the category for learning and teaching oriented theories of styles placed in between these. The placement of the horizontal axis between the cognition and personality oriented styles theories is meant to imply that all of the theories on this axis draw on both of these classical psychological disciplines. The horizontal axis consists of the category learning and teaching oriented theories of styles in the middle, to which is added two categories: to the right, a category for theories on approaches to learning, which are style-like concepts, but strictly speaking not styles. To the left, a category of multi-oriented theories of styles, first suggested by Nielsen (2001). In Figure 1, brackets indicate where originators of a number of the theories as well as where the four reviews in Table 1 would place the given theories, and disagreements on the placement of a theory are illustrated by arrows pointing to alternative category placements according to other authors.Figure 1

Bottom Line: In the last 25 years, several suggestions as to how theories of styles may be divided into categories and fields of focus have been offered.Theorists and researchers disagree about the criteria on which categorizations should be based, and about which theories fulfill these criteria.Such disagreements are fruitful at a theoretical level, but also have negative consequences for the intended fields of application of the style theories and the associated instruments for measuring styles, because practitioners seeking the theory and instrument best suited for their intended use/application simply cannot find their way through the jungle of disagreements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Oester farimagsgade 2A, DK-1353 Copenhagen K, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
In the 20th century, a large number of psychological theories of intellectual styles were developed. Different reviews mention up to 71 theories of style. In the last 25 years, several suggestions as to how theories of styles may be divided into categories and fields of focus have been offered. Theorists and researchers disagree about the criteria on which categorizations should be based, and about which theories fulfill these criteria. Such disagreements are fruitful at a theoretical level, but also have negative consequences for the intended fields of application of the style theories and the associated instruments for measuring styles, because practitioners seeking the theory and instrument best suited for their intended use/application simply cannot find their way through the jungle of disagreements. The present study seeks to reduce the confusion for practitioners seeking to employ styles, by developing a taxonomy of categorizations of style theories in which all style theories can be placed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus