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Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry.

Taguchi K, Kunioka M, Funabashi M, Ninomiya F - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: After cooling of extraction solutions, the resin was recovered as a fine semi-crystalline precipitate, which was easily filtered.This procedure could provide a suitable approach for estimation of biobased carbon content by AMS on the basis of the standard ASTM D 6866.The biobased carbon content for resin extracted from polyethylene composites allow for the calculation of biosynthetic polymer content, which is an indicator of mass percentage of the biobased plastic resin in the composite.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Innovation in Sustainable Chemistry, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8565 Japan.

ABSTRACT
An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 ((14)C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. After cooling of extraction solutions, the resin was recovered as a fine semi-crystalline precipitate, which was easily filtered. Recovery rates were almost identical (99%), even for low-density polyethylene and linear low-density polyethylene, which may have lower crystallinity. This procedure could provide a suitable approach for estimation of biobased carbon content by AMS on the basis of the standard ASTM D 6866. The biobased carbon content for resin extracted from polyethylene composites allow for the calculation of biosynthetic polymer content, which is an indicator of mass percentage of the biobased plastic resin in the composite.

No MeSH data available.


UV-visible spectra of films prepared from composites (resin/additive, 75/25), the corresponding recovered precipitates, and original resins. Composite of bHDPE/DBDPE (a), precipitate from bHDPE/DBDPE (b), bHDPE (c), composite of bLLDPE/DBDPE (d), precipitate from bLLDPE/DBDPE (e), bLLDPE (f), and chloroform solution of DBDPE (g).
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Fig6: UV-visible spectra of films prepared from composites (resin/additive, 75/25), the corresponding recovered precipitates, and original resins. Composite of bHDPE/DBDPE (a), precipitate from bHDPE/DBDPE (b), bHDPE (c), composite of bLLDPE/DBDPE (d), precipitate from bLLDPE/DBDPE (e), bLLDPE (f), and chloroform solution of DBDPE (g).

Mentions: Figure 6 shows the UV-visible spectra of thin composite films of bHDPE and bLLDPE containing DBDPE (75/25) and the films prepared from the corresponding precipitates (Entries 4 and 8 in Table 2). The composite films of bHDPE (Figure 6a) and bLLDPE (d) showed a strong absorption (and scattering) in the ultraviolet region due to the aromatic skeleton of the additive molecule. On the other hand, the films from precipitates showed weak absorption bands and backgrounds with light scattering (b and e). A decrease in the absorption bands for the composites of the organic additive indicated the efficiency of the isolation process. Ratios of the additive to resins, calculated from a chloroform reference solution of the additive (g), were small (0.02 wt% for bHDPE (Entry 4) and 0.04 wt% for bLLDPE (Entry 8)). These findings suggest that the formation of pure precipitates lacking any accompanying additive may depend on prompt crystallization of polymers from the solutions and a high degree of crystallinity of the polymer.Figure 6


Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry.

Taguchi K, Kunioka M, Funabashi M, Ninomiya F - Springerplus (2014)

UV-visible spectra of films prepared from composites (resin/additive, 75/25), the corresponding recovered precipitates, and original resins. Composite of bHDPE/DBDPE (a), precipitate from bHDPE/DBDPE (b), bHDPE (c), composite of bLLDPE/DBDPE (d), precipitate from bLLDPE/DBDPE (e), bLLDPE (f), and chloroform solution of DBDPE (g).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4320129&req=5

Fig6: UV-visible spectra of films prepared from composites (resin/additive, 75/25), the corresponding recovered precipitates, and original resins. Composite of bHDPE/DBDPE (a), precipitate from bHDPE/DBDPE (b), bHDPE (c), composite of bLLDPE/DBDPE (d), precipitate from bLLDPE/DBDPE (e), bLLDPE (f), and chloroform solution of DBDPE (g).
Mentions: Figure 6 shows the UV-visible spectra of thin composite films of bHDPE and bLLDPE containing DBDPE (75/25) and the films prepared from the corresponding precipitates (Entries 4 and 8 in Table 2). The composite films of bHDPE (Figure 6a) and bLLDPE (d) showed a strong absorption (and scattering) in the ultraviolet region due to the aromatic skeleton of the additive molecule. On the other hand, the films from precipitates showed weak absorption bands and backgrounds with light scattering (b and e). A decrease in the absorption bands for the composites of the organic additive indicated the efficiency of the isolation process. Ratios of the additive to resins, calculated from a chloroform reference solution of the additive (g), were small (0.02 wt% for bHDPE (Entry 4) and 0.04 wt% for bLLDPE (Entry 8)). These findings suggest that the formation of pure precipitates lacking any accompanying additive may depend on prompt crystallization of polymers from the solutions and a high degree of crystallinity of the polymer.Figure 6

Bottom Line: After cooling of extraction solutions, the resin was recovered as a fine semi-crystalline precipitate, which was easily filtered.This procedure could provide a suitable approach for estimation of biobased carbon content by AMS on the basis of the standard ASTM D 6866.The biobased carbon content for resin extracted from polyethylene composites allow for the calculation of biosynthetic polymer content, which is an indicator of mass percentage of the biobased plastic resin in the composite.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Innovation in Sustainable Chemistry, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8565 Japan.

ABSTRACT
An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 ((14)C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. After cooling of extraction solutions, the resin was recovered as a fine semi-crystalline precipitate, which was easily filtered. Recovery rates were almost identical (99%), even for low-density polyethylene and linear low-density polyethylene, which may have lower crystallinity. This procedure could provide a suitable approach for estimation of biobased carbon content by AMS on the basis of the standard ASTM D 6866. The biobased carbon content for resin extracted from polyethylene composites allow for the calculation of biosynthetic polymer content, which is an indicator of mass percentage of the biobased plastic resin in the composite.

No MeSH data available.