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Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla: A review discussion with two case reports.

Limdiwala P, Shah J - Contemp Clin Dent (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Most common clinical variant is associated with the impacted tooth and shows local invasion with destruction of adjacent structures and displacement of teeth.Radiographically, common manifestations are multilocular radiolucent areas with well-defined borders and typical soap bubble or tennis racket appearances.This paper presents two rare case reports of OM of maxilla along with review discussion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

ABSTRACT
Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare entity of slowly growing benign neoplasm of ectomesenchymal origin, comprising of 3-6% of all odontogenic tumors that histologically presenting spindle-shaped, stellate and round cells within loosely arranged myxomatous tissue stroma. OM originates from the dental papilla, follicle or periodontal ligament with an exclusive location in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws, association with missing or unerupted teeth. Clinically and radiographically the reported incidence and demographic information of this tumor has wide variability. Most common clinical variant is associated with the impacted tooth and shows local invasion with destruction of adjacent structures and displacement of teeth. Radiographically, common manifestations are multilocular radiolucent areas with well-defined borders and typical soap bubble or tennis racket appearances. This paper presents two rare case reports of OM of maxilla along with review discussion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Extraoral photograph of case 2 showing swelling on right maxilla with obliteration of nasolabial fold
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Figure 5: Extraoral photograph of case 2 showing swelling on right maxilla with obliteration of nasolabial fold

Mentions: Extraorally, swelling was around 4 cm × 3 cm in size at right maxilla with obliteration of nasolabial fold. Swelling was diffuse, nontender, hard in consistency, without any discharge. No history of nasal discharge, difficulty in breathing, paresthesia or anesthesia on the affected site. Overlying skin was normal in color with regional lymphadenopathy. No deviation of the lateral wall of the nose or no difficulty in mastication or trismus was found [Figure 5]. Intraoraly, swelling was well defined around 4 cm × 3 cm in size, extending from 13 to 18 teeth region with expansion of both cortical plates around 3 cm buccally and 2 cm palatally up to midline of palate. On palpation, swelling was hard, nontender, nonfluctuant without any discharge. Overlying mucosa was slightly red and inflamed. Tooth 17 was grossly carious with displacement of 16 palatally and 18 distally [Figure 6].


Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla: A review discussion with two case reports.

Limdiwala P, Shah J - Contemp Clin Dent (2015 Jan-Mar)

Extraoral photograph of case 2 showing swelling on right maxilla with obliteration of nasolabial fold
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4319334&req=5

Figure 5: Extraoral photograph of case 2 showing swelling on right maxilla with obliteration of nasolabial fold
Mentions: Extraorally, swelling was around 4 cm × 3 cm in size at right maxilla with obliteration of nasolabial fold. Swelling was diffuse, nontender, hard in consistency, without any discharge. No history of nasal discharge, difficulty in breathing, paresthesia or anesthesia on the affected site. Overlying skin was normal in color with regional lymphadenopathy. No deviation of the lateral wall of the nose or no difficulty in mastication or trismus was found [Figure 5]. Intraoraly, swelling was well defined around 4 cm × 3 cm in size, extending from 13 to 18 teeth region with expansion of both cortical plates around 3 cm buccally and 2 cm palatally up to midline of palate. On palpation, swelling was hard, nontender, nonfluctuant without any discharge. Overlying mucosa was slightly red and inflamed. Tooth 17 was grossly carious with displacement of 16 palatally and 18 distally [Figure 6].

Bottom Line: Most common clinical variant is associated with the impacted tooth and shows local invasion with destruction of adjacent structures and displacement of teeth.Radiographically, common manifestations are multilocular radiolucent areas with well-defined borders and typical soap bubble or tennis racket appearances.This paper presents two rare case reports of OM of maxilla along with review discussion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

ABSTRACT
Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare entity of slowly growing benign neoplasm of ectomesenchymal origin, comprising of 3-6% of all odontogenic tumors that histologically presenting spindle-shaped, stellate and round cells within loosely arranged myxomatous tissue stroma. OM originates from the dental papilla, follicle or periodontal ligament with an exclusive location in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws, association with missing or unerupted teeth. Clinically and radiographically the reported incidence and demographic information of this tumor has wide variability. Most common clinical variant is associated with the impacted tooth and shows local invasion with destruction of adjacent structures and displacement of teeth. Radiographically, common manifestations are multilocular radiolucent areas with well-defined borders and typical soap bubble or tennis racket appearances. This paper presents two rare case reports of OM of maxilla along with review discussion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus