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Clinical and radiological findings of a bilateral coronoid hyperplasia case.

Torenek K, Duman SB, Bayrakdar IS, Miloglu O - Eur J Dent (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Coronoid hyperplasia (CH) is an infrequent condition that can be defined as an abnormal bony elongation of histologically normal bone.Progressive and painless difficulty in opening the mouth is the main clinical finding of CH.In this case report, the clinical and radiological findings for a 23-year-old male patient with bilateral CH are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Diagnosis and Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkiye.

ABSTRACT
Coronoid hyperplasia (CH) is an infrequent condition that can be defined as an abnormal bony elongation of histologically normal bone. Progressive and painless difficulty in opening the mouth is the main clinical finding of CH. In this case report, the clinical and radiological findings for a 23-year-old male patient with bilateral CH are presented. When plain radiographies are not sufficient for diagnosis and evaluation of the CH, cone-beam computed tomography can be used.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

There was no fusion between the coronoid processes and zygomatic arches on the coronal slices with an open mouth
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Figure 4: There was no fusion between the coronoid processes and zygomatic arches on the coronal slices with an open mouth

Mentions: A 23-year-old male patient was referred to our dental clinic with a history of limitations in mouth opening. His medical anamnesis was not noteworthy. There were no musculoskeletal anomalies, congenital bone dysplasia, or trauma. Clinical examination did not reveal facial asymmetry, deviation, or pain. The interincisal mouth opening was measured as 18 mm. Crepitation and clicking of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were not seen. Pressure in the zygomatic region on maximal opening was detected. Hyperplasia of the coronoid process could be seen bilaterally on panoramic radiography and TMJ radiography, but that was not clear [Figure 1 and 2]. Therefore, CBCT was utilized for detailed diagnosis. Informed consent was received from the patient for the exposures. The patient had been scanned with CBCT (NewTom FP QR-DVT 9000, 110 kVp, 15 mA, 36 s scan time, 5.4 s typical X-ray emission time, 17 cm diameter–13 cm height scan volume, Verona, Italy) with an open and closed mouth to evaluate temporomandibular bone structure, condylar movement, and relationships among condyle, eminence, and zygomatic arch. The patient was placed in a horizontal position so that the Frankfort horizontal plane was perpendicular to the table, with the head within the circular gantry of the X-ray tube in order to obtain a consistent orientation of sagittal images. Raw data obtained from the CBCT generated volumetric and study data, including information on the mandible, using the NNT software program (QR-NNT version 2.21, Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy) for analysis. Images obtained from CBCT were examined in a multiplanar reconstruction mode. CH was observed on sagittal slices taken in the closed mouth [Figure 3]. Impingement of the bilateral CH with the medial aspects of the zygomatic arches was observed on the axial and coronal slices taken in the open mouth. There was no fusion between the coronoid processes and zygomatic arches on higher axial slices [Figures 4 and 5]. According to a three-dimensional view, CH was detected bilaterally in the mandible [Figures 6 and 7].


Clinical and radiological findings of a bilateral coronoid hyperplasia case.

Torenek K, Duman SB, Bayrakdar IS, Miloglu O - Eur J Dent (2015 Jan-Mar)

There was no fusion between the coronoid processes and zygomatic arches on the coronal slices with an open mouth
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4319292&req=5

Figure 4: There was no fusion between the coronoid processes and zygomatic arches on the coronal slices with an open mouth
Mentions: A 23-year-old male patient was referred to our dental clinic with a history of limitations in mouth opening. His medical anamnesis was not noteworthy. There were no musculoskeletal anomalies, congenital bone dysplasia, or trauma. Clinical examination did not reveal facial asymmetry, deviation, or pain. The interincisal mouth opening was measured as 18 mm. Crepitation and clicking of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were not seen. Pressure in the zygomatic region on maximal opening was detected. Hyperplasia of the coronoid process could be seen bilaterally on panoramic radiography and TMJ radiography, but that was not clear [Figure 1 and 2]. Therefore, CBCT was utilized for detailed diagnosis. Informed consent was received from the patient for the exposures. The patient had been scanned with CBCT (NewTom FP QR-DVT 9000, 110 kVp, 15 mA, 36 s scan time, 5.4 s typical X-ray emission time, 17 cm diameter–13 cm height scan volume, Verona, Italy) with an open and closed mouth to evaluate temporomandibular bone structure, condylar movement, and relationships among condyle, eminence, and zygomatic arch. The patient was placed in a horizontal position so that the Frankfort horizontal plane was perpendicular to the table, with the head within the circular gantry of the X-ray tube in order to obtain a consistent orientation of sagittal images. Raw data obtained from the CBCT generated volumetric and study data, including information on the mandible, using the NNT software program (QR-NNT version 2.21, Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy) for analysis. Images obtained from CBCT were examined in a multiplanar reconstruction mode. CH was observed on sagittal slices taken in the closed mouth [Figure 3]. Impingement of the bilateral CH with the medial aspects of the zygomatic arches was observed on the axial and coronal slices taken in the open mouth. There was no fusion between the coronoid processes and zygomatic arches on higher axial slices [Figures 4 and 5]. According to a three-dimensional view, CH was detected bilaterally in the mandible [Figures 6 and 7].

Bottom Line: Coronoid hyperplasia (CH) is an infrequent condition that can be defined as an abnormal bony elongation of histologically normal bone.Progressive and painless difficulty in opening the mouth is the main clinical finding of CH.In this case report, the clinical and radiological findings for a 23-year-old male patient with bilateral CH are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Diagnosis and Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkiye.

ABSTRACT
Coronoid hyperplasia (CH) is an infrequent condition that can be defined as an abnormal bony elongation of histologically normal bone. Progressive and painless difficulty in opening the mouth is the main clinical finding of CH. In this case report, the clinical and radiological findings for a 23-year-old male patient with bilateral CH are presented. When plain radiographies are not sufficient for diagnosis and evaluation of the CH, cone-beam computed tomography can be used.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus