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Impact of information technology on information gaps in canadian ambulatory care encounters.

Korosec L, Balenko K, Hagens S - JMIR Med Inform (2015)

Bottom Line: Unconnected physicians were significantly more likely to be missing information they needed for patient encounters (13% of encounters for Unconnected physicians vs 7% for Connected physicians).Lab results were the most common type of patient information missing for both Unconnected and Connected specialists (25% for Unconnected physicians vs 11% Connected physicians).The results from this study indicate that Canadian physicians commonly experience information gaps in ambulatory encounters, and that many of these gaps are of consequence to themselves, their patients, and the healthcare system.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Ipsos-Reid Corporation, Toronto, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Specialist physicians require clinical information for patient visits in ambulatory encounters, some of which they may access via digital health solutions.

Objective: This study explored the completeness of information for patient care and the consequences of gaps for ambulatory specialist services provided in ambulatory settings in Canada.

Methods: A sample of specialist physicians practising in outpatient clinics was recruited from a health care provider research panel. The study (n=1800 patient encounters) looked at the completeness of patient information experienced by physicians who work in environments with rich health information exchange (Connected) and a comparison cohort with less information available electronically (Unconnected).

Results: Unconnected physicians were significantly more likely to be missing information they needed for patient encounters (13% of encounters for Unconnected physicians vs 7% for Connected physicians). Unconnected physicians were also more likely to report that missing information had consequences (23% vs 13% of encounters). Lab results were the most common type of patient information missing for both Unconnected and Connected specialists (25% for Unconnected physicians vs 11% Connected physicians).

Conclusions: The results from this study indicate that Canadian physicians commonly experience information gaps in ambulatory encounters, and that many of these gaps are of consequence to themselves, their patients, and the healthcare system. Wasting physician and patient time, as well as being forced to proceed with incomplete information, were the most common consequences of information gaps reported.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Missing information by required patient information.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure1: Missing information by required patient information.

Mentions: Connected physicians were more likely than Unconnected physicians to report having the patient information they needed during clinical encounters. This was true across all of the five types of information most often required (see Figure 1). The largest differential between the two groups was missing lab results (25% Unconnected vs 11% Connected) or diagnostic imaging test results (20% Unconnected vs 11% Connected).


Impact of information technology on information gaps in canadian ambulatory care encounters.

Korosec L, Balenko K, Hagens S - JMIR Med Inform (2015)

Missing information by required patient information.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318678&req=5

figure1: Missing information by required patient information.
Mentions: Connected physicians were more likely than Unconnected physicians to report having the patient information they needed during clinical encounters. This was true across all of the five types of information most often required (see Figure 1). The largest differential between the two groups was missing lab results (25% Unconnected vs 11% Connected) or diagnostic imaging test results (20% Unconnected vs 11% Connected).

Bottom Line: Unconnected physicians were significantly more likely to be missing information they needed for patient encounters (13% of encounters for Unconnected physicians vs 7% for Connected physicians).Lab results were the most common type of patient information missing for both Unconnected and Connected specialists (25% for Unconnected physicians vs 11% Connected physicians).The results from this study indicate that Canadian physicians commonly experience information gaps in ambulatory encounters, and that many of these gaps are of consequence to themselves, their patients, and the healthcare system.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Ipsos-Reid Corporation, Toronto, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Specialist physicians require clinical information for patient visits in ambulatory encounters, some of which they may access via digital health solutions.

Objective: This study explored the completeness of information for patient care and the consequences of gaps for ambulatory specialist services provided in ambulatory settings in Canada.

Methods: A sample of specialist physicians practising in outpatient clinics was recruited from a health care provider research panel. The study (n=1800 patient encounters) looked at the completeness of patient information experienced by physicians who work in environments with rich health information exchange (Connected) and a comparison cohort with less information available electronically (Unconnected).

Results: Unconnected physicians were significantly more likely to be missing information they needed for patient encounters (13% of encounters for Unconnected physicians vs 7% for Connected physicians). Unconnected physicians were also more likely to report that missing information had consequences (23% vs 13% of encounters). Lab results were the most common type of patient information missing for both Unconnected and Connected specialists (25% for Unconnected physicians vs 11% Connected physicians).

Conclusions: The results from this study indicate that Canadian physicians commonly experience information gaps in ambulatory encounters, and that many of these gaps are of consequence to themselves, their patients, and the healthcare system. Wasting physician and patient time, as well as being forced to proceed with incomplete information, were the most common consequences of information gaps reported.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus