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Adult lung function and long-term air pollution exposure. ESCAPE: a multicentre cohort study and meta-analysis.

Adam M, Schikowski T, Carsin AE, Cai Y, Jacquemin B, Sanchez M, Vierkötter A, Marcon A, Keidel D, Sugiri D, Al Kanani Z, Nadif R, Siroux V, Hardy R, Kuh D, Rochat T, Bridevaux PO, Eeftens M, Tsai MY, Villani S, Phuleria HC, Birk M, Cyrys J, Cirach M, de Nazelle A, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Forsberg B, de Hoogh K, Declerq C, Bono R, Piccioni P, Quass U, Heinrich J, Jarvis D, Pin I, Beelen R, Hoek G, Brunekreef B, Schindler C, Sunyer J, Krämer U, Kauffmann F, Hansell AL, Künzli N, Probst-Hensch N - Eur. Respir. J. (2014)

Bottom Line: Cohort-specific results were combined using meta-analysis.An increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, but not other PM metrics (PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM, PM absorbance), was associated with a lower level of FEV₁ (-44.6 mL, 95% CI -85.4 to -3.8) and FVC (-59.0 mL, 95% CI -112.3 to -5.6).The associations were particularly strong in obese persons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel University of Basel, Basel These authors contributed equally.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot displaying the study-specific mixed linear regression model estimates of the association of NO2 with level of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1; in mL) in obese participants (body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg·m−2). NO2_1 indicates NO2 measured at time of ESCAPE. Associations with lung function measures are presented as increments in NO2 per 10 μg·m−3. I-square: variation in estimated effects attributable to heterogeneity. D+L (Der Simonian and Laird method): pooled estimate of all studies. The mixed linear regression models were adjusted for: age, age squared, height, sex, BMI, highest educational level, and smoking status at second spirometry; negative estimates indicated lower lung function with increasing exposure. p-value for heterogeneity, obese versus non-obese: 0.098 for FEV1. ES: effect size.
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Figure 4: Forest plot displaying the study-specific mixed linear regression model estimates of the association of NO2 with level of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1; in mL) in obese participants (body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg·m−2). NO2_1 indicates NO2 measured at time of ESCAPE. Associations with lung function measures are presented as increments in NO2 per 10 μg·m−3. I-square: variation in estimated effects attributable to heterogeneity. D+L (Der Simonian and Laird method): pooled estimate of all studies. The mixed linear regression models were adjusted for: age, age squared, height, sex, BMI, highest educational level, and smoking status at second spirometry; negative estimates indicated lower lung function with increasing exposure. p-value for heterogeneity, obese versus non-obese: 0.098 for FEV1. ES: effect size.

Mentions: In subgroup analysis, the NO2 and NOx (data not shown) associations with FEV1 and FVC were particularly observed in obese participants (FEV1: figures 3 and 4; FVC: supplementary figures S2 and S3) (p-values for heterogeneity, obese versus non-obese: p=0.098 for NO2/FEV1 (figures 3 and 4); p=0.026 for NO2/FVC (supplementary figures S2 and S3); p=0.050 for NOx/FVC). All other tested factors (sex, smoking and asthma status) showed no or only weak evidence for modification of the air pollution lung function associations (NO2: supplementary table S8). The effect modification by obesity was also evident in sex-stratified analyses, with substantially stronger inverse NO2 and NOx associations with FEV1 and FVC, in both obese females and males (NO2: supplementary table S9).


Adult lung function and long-term air pollution exposure. ESCAPE: a multicentre cohort study and meta-analysis.

Adam M, Schikowski T, Carsin AE, Cai Y, Jacquemin B, Sanchez M, Vierkötter A, Marcon A, Keidel D, Sugiri D, Al Kanani Z, Nadif R, Siroux V, Hardy R, Kuh D, Rochat T, Bridevaux PO, Eeftens M, Tsai MY, Villani S, Phuleria HC, Birk M, Cyrys J, Cirach M, de Nazelle A, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Forsberg B, de Hoogh K, Declerq C, Bono R, Piccioni P, Quass U, Heinrich J, Jarvis D, Pin I, Beelen R, Hoek G, Brunekreef B, Schindler C, Sunyer J, Krämer U, Kauffmann F, Hansell AL, Künzli N, Probst-Hensch N - Eur. Respir. J. (2014)

Forest plot displaying the study-specific mixed linear regression model estimates of the association of NO2 with level of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1; in mL) in obese participants (body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg·m−2). NO2_1 indicates NO2 measured at time of ESCAPE. Associations with lung function measures are presented as increments in NO2 per 10 μg·m−3. I-square: variation in estimated effects attributable to heterogeneity. D+L (Der Simonian and Laird method): pooled estimate of all studies. The mixed linear regression models were adjusted for: age, age squared, height, sex, BMI, highest educational level, and smoking status at second spirometry; negative estimates indicated lower lung function with increasing exposure. p-value for heterogeneity, obese versus non-obese: 0.098 for FEV1. ES: effect size.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318659&req=5

Figure 4: Forest plot displaying the study-specific mixed linear regression model estimates of the association of NO2 with level of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1; in mL) in obese participants (body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg·m−2). NO2_1 indicates NO2 measured at time of ESCAPE. Associations with lung function measures are presented as increments in NO2 per 10 μg·m−3. I-square: variation in estimated effects attributable to heterogeneity. D+L (Der Simonian and Laird method): pooled estimate of all studies. The mixed linear regression models were adjusted for: age, age squared, height, sex, BMI, highest educational level, and smoking status at second spirometry; negative estimates indicated lower lung function with increasing exposure. p-value for heterogeneity, obese versus non-obese: 0.098 for FEV1. ES: effect size.
Mentions: In subgroup analysis, the NO2 and NOx (data not shown) associations with FEV1 and FVC were particularly observed in obese participants (FEV1: figures 3 and 4; FVC: supplementary figures S2 and S3) (p-values for heterogeneity, obese versus non-obese: p=0.098 for NO2/FEV1 (figures 3 and 4); p=0.026 for NO2/FVC (supplementary figures S2 and S3); p=0.050 for NOx/FVC). All other tested factors (sex, smoking and asthma status) showed no or only weak evidence for modification of the air pollution lung function associations (NO2: supplementary table S8). The effect modification by obesity was also evident in sex-stratified analyses, with substantially stronger inverse NO2 and NOx associations with FEV1 and FVC, in both obese females and males (NO2: supplementary table S9).

Bottom Line: Cohort-specific results were combined using meta-analysis.An increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, but not other PM metrics (PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM, PM absorbance), was associated with a lower level of FEV₁ (-44.6 mL, 95% CI -85.4 to -3.8) and FVC (-59.0 mL, 95% CI -112.3 to -5.6).The associations were particularly strong in obese persons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel University of Basel, Basel These authors contributed equally.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus