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Relative recency influences object-in-context memory.

Tam SK, Bonardi C, Robinson J - Behav. Brain Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Usually more exploration is seen of the object that has not previously been paired with the test context, an effect attributed to the ability to remember where an object was encountered.RR could contaminate performance on the OIC task, by enhancing the OIC effect when animals are tested in context y, and masking it when the test is in context x.This possibility was examined in two experiments, and evidence for superior performance in context y was obtained.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom. Electronic address: eric.tam@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.

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Design of Experiment 2.
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fig0015: Design of Experiment 2.

Mentions: Both these alternative explanations rely on the suggestion that the two contexts differed in their familiarity, either during preexposure or at test. Such a difference is an intrinsic part of the procedure and so cannot be entirely eliminated, but it can be minimized. This was the purpose of Experiment 2 (Fig. 3). In this study all rats were preexposed to both contexts before the experiment began, and the experiment was conducted within subjects, so that all rats received training with two sets of objects in the two contexts, but were tested with one set of objects in context x, and with the other in context y. Both these factors would increase the familiarity of both contexts and encourage full habituation of potential competing exploratory behaviour. In addition, the interval between the second sample and the test phase was extended from 5 min to 2 h, thus minimizing differences in the relative recency of the two contexts. Finally, we recorded exploration during the two sample trials, to explicitly evaluate the possibility that this could have differentially biased exploration of the objects during the preexposure phase.


Relative recency influences object-in-context memory.

Tam SK, Bonardi C, Robinson J - Behav. Brain Res. (2014)

Design of Experiment 2.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318627&req=5

fig0015: Design of Experiment 2.
Mentions: Both these alternative explanations rely on the suggestion that the two contexts differed in their familiarity, either during preexposure or at test. Such a difference is an intrinsic part of the procedure and so cannot be entirely eliminated, but it can be minimized. This was the purpose of Experiment 2 (Fig. 3). In this study all rats were preexposed to both contexts before the experiment began, and the experiment was conducted within subjects, so that all rats received training with two sets of objects in the two contexts, but were tested with one set of objects in context x, and with the other in context y. Both these factors would increase the familiarity of both contexts and encourage full habituation of potential competing exploratory behaviour. In addition, the interval between the second sample and the test phase was extended from 5 min to 2 h, thus minimizing differences in the relative recency of the two contexts. Finally, we recorded exploration during the two sample trials, to explicitly evaluate the possibility that this could have differentially biased exploration of the objects during the preexposure phase.

Bottom Line: Usually more exploration is seen of the object that has not previously been paired with the test context, an effect attributed to the ability to remember where an object was encountered.RR could contaminate performance on the OIC task, by enhancing the OIC effect when animals are tested in context y, and masking it when the test is in context x.This possibility was examined in two experiments, and evidence for superior performance in context y was obtained.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom. Electronic address: eric.tam@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus