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Relative recency influences object-in-context memory.

Tam SK, Bonardi C, Robinson J - Behav. Brain Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Usually more exploration is seen of the object that has not previously been paired with the test context, an effect attributed to the ability to remember where an object was encountered.RR could contaminate performance on the OIC task, by enhancing the OIC effect when animals are tested in context y, and masking it when the test is in context x.This possibility was examined in two experiments, and evidence for superior performance in context y was obtained.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom. Electronic address: eric.tam@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.

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Mean discrimination ratios for the first and second minutes of the test of Experiment 1. Bars show standard error of the mean.
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fig0010: Mean discrimination ratios for the first and second minutes of the test of Experiment 1. Bars show standard error of the mean.

Mentions: The test data are summarized in Fig. 2, and indicate a stronger OIC bias in Group y than in Group x. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) with group and minute as factors confirmed this description, yielding a reliable main effect of group only, F(1, 10) = 7.7, p < .020, MSE = .073, 95% CI = [.01, .68]; neither the main effect of minute nor the interaction was reliable, smallest p > .100, F(1, 10) = 3.2, MSE = .022.


Relative recency influences object-in-context memory.

Tam SK, Bonardi C, Robinson J - Behav. Brain Res. (2014)

Mean discrimination ratios for the first and second minutes of the test of Experiment 1. Bars show standard error of the mean.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318627&req=5

fig0010: Mean discrimination ratios for the first and second minutes of the test of Experiment 1. Bars show standard error of the mean.
Mentions: The test data are summarized in Fig. 2, and indicate a stronger OIC bias in Group y than in Group x. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) with group and minute as factors confirmed this description, yielding a reliable main effect of group only, F(1, 10) = 7.7, p < .020, MSE = .073, 95% CI = [.01, .68]; neither the main effect of minute nor the interaction was reliable, smallest p > .100, F(1, 10) = 3.2, MSE = .022.

Bottom Line: Usually more exploration is seen of the object that has not previously been paired with the test context, an effect attributed to the ability to remember where an object was encountered.RR could contaminate performance on the OIC task, by enhancing the OIC effect when animals are tested in context y, and masking it when the test is in context x.This possibility was examined in two experiments, and evidence for superior performance in context y was obtained.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom. Electronic address: eric.tam@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus