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Relative recency influences object-in-context memory.

Tam SK, Bonardi C, Robinson J - Behav. Brain Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Usually more exploration is seen of the object that has not previously been paired with the test context, an effect attributed to the ability to remember where an object was encountered.RR could contaminate performance on the OIC task, by enhancing the OIC effect when animals are tested in context y, and masking it when the test is in context x.This possibility was examined in two experiments, and evidence for superior performance in context y was obtained.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom. Electronic address: eric.tam@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.

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Design of Experiment 1 and example of specific objects and contexts presented in the sample phases of an OIC recognition trial. A rat is allowed to freely explore one type of object (A) in one visual context (x), and subsequently, a different type of object (B) in a different visual context (y). Following these two sample phases animals are given a choice between A and B, either in the less recent context x, or in the more recent context y. Note that object A has been encountered earlier than object B, and thus, at the time of test, the memory trace of object A would be relatively weaker than that of object B.
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fig0005: Design of Experiment 1 and example of specific objects and contexts presented in the sample phases of an OIC recognition trial. A rat is allowed to freely explore one type of object (A) in one visual context (x), and subsequently, a different type of object (B) in a different visual context (y). Following these two sample phases animals are given a choice between A and B, either in the less recent context x, or in the more recent context y. Note that object A has been encountered earlier than object B, and thus, at the time of test, the memory trace of object A would be relatively weaker than that of object B.

Mentions: The phenomenon of spontaneous object recognition (SOR)—the observation that animals show a preference for exploring a novel object rather than one that has been previously encountered [1–3]—underlies a variety of tasks designed to examine memory processes in rats and mice. One version of this, the object-in-context (OIC) task, is used to assess rodents’ ability to remember where they have encountered a specific object. In one typical variant of this task the rodent is allowed first to freely explore one type of object, A, in one context, x, and subsequently a different type of object, B, in another context, y (see Fig. 1). Each context-object pairing usually consists of a single trial. After a delay, a test with objects A and B is given in one or other of the two contexts. It is typically reported that normal animals show a preference for the object that has not been encountered in the test context [4–12]. It has been proposed that this task relates to the ‘where’ component of episodic memory (e.g., [11,12]), context memory (e.g., [6]), recollection (e.g., [8]) or, more generally, contextual processing [7,9,10].


Relative recency influences object-in-context memory.

Tam SK, Bonardi C, Robinson J - Behav. Brain Res. (2014)

Design of Experiment 1 and example of specific objects and contexts presented in the sample phases of an OIC recognition trial. A rat is allowed to freely explore one type of object (A) in one visual context (x), and subsequently, a different type of object (B) in a different visual context (y). Following these two sample phases animals are given a choice between A and B, either in the less recent context x, or in the more recent context y. Note that object A has been encountered earlier than object B, and thus, at the time of test, the memory trace of object A would be relatively weaker than that of object B.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318627&req=5

fig0005: Design of Experiment 1 and example of specific objects and contexts presented in the sample phases of an OIC recognition trial. A rat is allowed to freely explore one type of object (A) in one visual context (x), and subsequently, a different type of object (B) in a different visual context (y). Following these two sample phases animals are given a choice between A and B, either in the less recent context x, or in the more recent context y. Note that object A has been encountered earlier than object B, and thus, at the time of test, the memory trace of object A would be relatively weaker than that of object B.
Mentions: The phenomenon of spontaneous object recognition (SOR)—the observation that animals show a preference for exploring a novel object rather than one that has been previously encountered [1–3]—underlies a variety of tasks designed to examine memory processes in rats and mice. One version of this, the object-in-context (OIC) task, is used to assess rodents’ ability to remember where they have encountered a specific object. In one typical variant of this task the rodent is allowed first to freely explore one type of object, A, in one context, x, and subsequently a different type of object, B, in another context, y (see Fig. 1). Each context-object pairing usually consists of a single trial. After a delay, a test with objects A and B is given in one or other of the two contexts. It is typically reported that normal animals show a preference for the object that has not been encountered in the test context [4–12]. It has been proposed that this task relates to the ‘where’ component of episodic memory (e.g., [11,12]), context memory (e.g., [6]), recollection (e.g., [8]) or, more generally, contextual processing [7,9,10].

Bottom Line: Usually more exploration is seen of the object that has not previously been paired with the test context, an effect attributed to the ability to remember where an object was encountered.RR could contaminate performance on the OIC task, by enhancing the OIC effect when animals are tested in context y, and masking it when the test is in context x.This possibility was examined in two experiments, and evidence for superior performance in context y was obtained.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom. Electronic address: eric.tam@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus