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Cell type-specific effects of adenosine on cortical neurons.

van Aerde KI, Qi G, Feldmeyer D - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Bottom Line: Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date.We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location.These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-2, D-52425 Jülich, Germany Current address: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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Adenosine decreases cell excitability of pyramidal neurons in a layer- and subtype-specific way, while leaving interneuron excitability unaffected. Schematic summary of the effects of adenosine on pyramidal and interneurons in layer (L) 2–6 of the prefrontal cortex microcircuit. Arrows and color indicate the size of the adenosine-induced decrease in cell excitability of L2–6 pyramidal neurons (filled neurons). Interneurons (round somata) and pyramidal neurons with white somas are not affected by adenosine. Percentages for main subcortical projection areas are from Gabbott et al. (2005), and projection areas for RS and Ad subtypes in layer 5 are adapted from Dembrow et al. (2010) and Gee et al. (2012). Dendrites are depicted with thick lines, axons with thin lines. WM, white matter.
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BHT274F10: Adenosine decreases cell excitability of pyramidal neurons in a layer- and subtype-specific way, while leaving interneuron excitability unaffected. Schematic summary of the effects of adenosine on pyramidal and interneurons in layer (L) 2–6 of the prefrontal cortex microcircuit. Arrows and color indicate the size of the adenosine-induced decrease in cell excitability of L2–6 pyramidal neurons (filled neurons). Interneurons (round somata) and pyramidal neurons with white somas are not affected by adenosine. Percentages for main subcortical projection areas are from Gabbott et al. (2005), and projection areas for RS and Ad subtypes in layer 5 are adapted from Dembrow et al. (2010) and Gee et al. (2012). Dendrites are depicted with thick lines, axons with thin lines. WM, white matter.

Mentions: The present study demonstrates that the neuromodulator adenosine, which plays an important role in sleep homeostasis, does not exercise a general inhibitory tone on the cortical network as previously hypothesized, but rather specifically modulates each pyramidal neuron subtype in a distinct fashion (Fig. 10). Our results from interneurons and pyramidal neurons in the rat mPFC are likely to apply to neurons in other cortical areas, as we obtained similar results for the rat somatosensory cortex. Adenosine decreased cellular excitability of most pyramidal neuron subtypes via adenosine A1 receptors that lead to the opening of potassium channels. Furthermore, passive properties like cellular input resistance, membrane time constant, RMP, and cellular excitability were correlated with the size of the adenosine response, as well as the relative field span of the apical dendritic tuft.Figure 10.


Cell type-specific effects of adenosine on cortical neurons.

van Aerde KI, Qi G, Feldmeyer D - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Adenosine decreases cell excitability of pyramidal neurons in a layer- and subtype-specific way, while leaving interneuron excitability unaffected. Schematic summary of the effects of adenosine on pyramidal and interneurons in layer (L) 2–6 of the prefrontal cortex microcircuit. Arrows and color indicate the size of the adenosine-induced decrease in cell excitability of L2–6 pyramidal neurons (filled neurons). Interneurons (round somata) and pyramidal neurons with white somas are not affected by adenosine. Percentages for main subcortical projection areas are from Gabbott et al. (2005), and projection areas for RS and Ad subtypes in layer 5 are adapted from Dembrow et al. (2010) and Gee et al. (2012). Dendrites are depicted with thick lines, axons with thin lines. WM, white matter.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318536&req=5

BHT274F10: Adenosine decreases cell excitability of pyramidal neurons in a layer- and subtype-specific way, while leaving interneuron excitability unaffected. Schematic summary of the effects of adenosine on pyramidal and interneurons in layer (L) 2–6 of the prefrontal cortex microcircuit. Arrows and color indicate the size of the adenosine-induced decrease in cell excitability of L2–6 pyramidal neurons (filled neurons). Interneurons (round somata) and pyramidal neurons with white somas are not affected by adenosine. Percentages for main subcortical projection areas are from Gabbott et al. (2005), and projection areas for RS and Ad subtypes in layer 5 are adapted from Dembrow et al. (2010) and Gee et al. (2012). Dendrites are depicted with thick lines, axons with thin lines. WM, white matter.
Mentions: The present study demonstrates that the neuromodulator adenosine, which plays an important role in sleep homeostasis, does not exercise a general inhibitory tone on the cortical network as previously hypothesized, but rather specifically modulates each pyramidal neuron subtype in a distinct fashion (Fig. 10). Our results from interneurons and pyramidal neurons in the rat mPFC are likely to apply to neurons in other cortical areas, as we obtained similar results for the rat somatosensory cortex. Adenosine decreased cellular excitability of most pyramidal neuron subtypes via adenosine A1 receptors that lead to the opening of potassium channels. Furthermore, passive properties like cellular input resistance, membrane time constant, RMP, and cellular excitability were correlated with the size of the adenosine response, as well as the relative field span of the apical dendritic tuft.Figure 10.

Bottom Line: Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date.We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location.These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-2, D-52425 Jülich, Germany Current address: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus