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Cell type-specific effects of adenosine on cortical neurons.

van Aerde KI, Qi G, Feldmeyer D - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Bottom Line: Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date.We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location.These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-2, D-52425 Jülich, Germany Current address: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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Correlation between cellular properties and adenosine sensitivity. (A–F) Size of adenosine-induced hyperpolarization as a function of cellular input resistance (A), membrane time constant (B), RMP (C), rheobase current (D), spike-time adaptation (E, ISI 3 divided by ISI-9. Accel., accelerating), and cell morphology (F, the ratio of the spanning width of apical/basal dendrites is taken as a measure for the slenderness or broadness of apical tufts). Linear fits are shown as black dashed line. Pyramidal neurons from layer 2 (red asterisks), layer 3 (yellow hourglass), layer 5 (blue squares), and layer 6 (purple triangles) were grouped for correlation analysis (n = 68, P < 0.01, unless otherwise indicated).
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BHT274F9: Correlation between cellular properties and adenosine sensitivity. (A–F) Size of adenosine-induced hyperpolarization as a function of cellular input resistance (A), membrane time constant (B), RMP (C), rheobase current (D), spike-time adaptation (E, ISI 3 divided by ISI-9. Accel., accelerating), and cell morphology (F, the ratio of the spanning width of apical/basal dendrites is taken as a measure for the slenderness or broadness of apical tufts). Linear fits are shown as black dashed line. Pyramidal neurons from layer 2 (red asterisks), layer 3 (yellow hourglass), layer 5 (blue squares), and layer 6 (purple triangles) were grouped for correlation analysis (n = 68, P < 0.01, unless otherwise indicated).

Mentions: Because of the profound differences in passive membrane properties between pyramidal neurons in different cortical layers and between specific neuronal subtypes within cortical layers, we wondered if there was a correlation between passive membrane properties and the size of the adenosine-induced hyperpolarization in our complete data set from the prefrontal cortex (n = 68). Indeed, significant correlations were found for cellular input resistance, membrane time constant, RMP, and rheobase current (Fig. 9).Figure 9.


Cell type-specific effects of adenosine on cortical neurons.

van Aerde KI, Qi G, Feldmeyer D - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Correlation between cellular properties and adenosine sensitivity. (A–F) Size of adenosine-induced hyperpolarization as a function of cellular input resistance (A), membrane time constant (B), RMP (C), rheobase current (D), spike-time adaptation (E, ISI 3 divided by ISI-9. Accel., accelerating), and cell morphology (F, the ratio of the spanning width of apical/basal dendrites is taken as a measure for the slenderness or broadness of apical tufts). Linear fits are shown as black dashed line. Pyramidal neurons from layer 2 (red asterisks), layer 3 (yellow hourglass), layer 5 (blue squares), and layer 6 (purple triangles) were grouped for correlation analysis (n = 68, P < 0.01, unless otherwise indicated).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318536&req=5

BHT274F9: Correlation between cellular properties and adenosine sensitivity. (A–F) Size of adenosine-induced hyperpolarization as a function of cellular input resistance (A), membrane time constant (B), RMP (C), rheobase current (D), spike-time adaptation (E, ISI 3 divided by ISI-9. Accel., accelerating), and cell morphology (F, the ratio of the spanning width of apical/basal dendrites is taken as a measure for the slenderness or broadness of apical tufts). Linear fits are shown as black dashed line. Pyramidal neurons from layer 2 (red asterisks), layer 3 (yellow hourglass), layer 5 (blue squares), and layer 6 (purple triangles) were grouped for correlation analysis (n = 68, P < 0.01, unless otherwise indicated).
Mentions: Because of the profound differences in passive membrane properties between pyramidal neurons in different cortical layers and between specific neuronal subtypes within cortical layers, we wondered if there was a correlation between passive membrane properties and the size of the adenosine-induced hyperpolarization in our complete data set from the prefrontal cortex (n = 68). Indeed, significant correlations were found for cellular input resistance, membrane time constant, RMP, and rheobase current (Fig. 9).Figure 9.

Bottom Line: Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date.We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location.These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-2, D-52425 Jülich, Germany Current address: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus