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Cell type-specific effects of adenosine on cortical neurons.

van Aerde KI, Qi G, Feldmeyer D - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Bottom Line: Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date.We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location.These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-2, D-52425 Jülich, Germany Current address: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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Layer 3 contains adenosine-sensitive and -insensitive pyramidal neurons. (A) Left, example traces of the RMP during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow). Average response is shown in black (top, responding neurons; bottom, nonresponding neurons). Right, RMP during control and 100 μM adenosine (“ado”) conditions. (B) Morphological reconstruction of soma and dendrites and corresponding electrophysiological profile from L3 pyramidal cell subtypes. The electrophysiological response is shown when minimally 10 APs were elicited (corresponding current steps in gray). The inset shows a magnification of the first spikes (scale bar: 25 mV, 50 ms), except for bursting neurons. Here, the inset shows the typical response to medium current injections: a burst of 4–5 APs followed by silence (scale bar: 50 mV, 500 ms). (C) Adenosine-induced hyperpolarization of the RMP [RS, n = 6; broad tufted adapting (Ad), n = 3; B, bursting, n = 4; slender tufted Ad, n = 3]. (D) Left, example traces of the current across the cell membrane during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow) when the neurons were voltage clamped at −50 mV. Average response is shown in black (top, nonresponding neurons; bottom, responding neurons). Right, adenosine-induced current in nonresponding (“nonresp.”, n = 4) and responding neurons (“resp.”, n = 5). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01.
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BHT274F3: Layer 3 contains adenosine-sensitive and -insensitive pyramidal neurons. (A) Left, example traces of the RMP during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow). Average response is shown in black (top, responding neurons; bottom, nonresponding neurons). Right, RMP during control and 100 μM adenosine (“ado”) conditions. (B) Morphological reconstruction of soma and dendrites and corresponding electrophysiological profile from L3 pyramidal cell subtypes. The electrophysiological response is shown when minimally 10 APs were elicited (corresponding current steps in gray). The inset shows a magnification of the first spikes (scale bar: 25 mV, 50 ms), except for bursting neurons. Here, the inset shows the typical response to medium current injections: a burst of 4–5 APs followed by silence (scale bar: 50 mV, 500 ms). (C) Adenosine-induced hyperpolarization of the RMP [RS, n = 6; broad tufted adapting (Ad), n = 3; B, bursting, n = 4; slender tufted Ad, n = 3]. (D) Left, example traces of the current across the cell membrane during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow) when the neurons were voltage clamped at −50 mV. Average response is shown in black (top, nonresponding neurons; bottom, responding neurons). Right, adenosine-induced current in nonresponding (“nonresp.”, n = 4) and responding neurons (“resp.”, n = 5). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01.

Mentions: Pyramidal cells in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex showed a high variability in response to adenosine application: About 70% of the population responded with a hyperpolarization of the RMP following adenosine application, whereas the remaining 30% was insensitive to adenosine application (Fig. 3A). Passive cell properties showed significant changes for the adenosine-sensitive neurons, but remained unchanged for the adenosine-insensitive L3 pyramidal neurons (Table 1).Figure 3.


Cell type-specific effects of adenosine on cortical neurons.

van Aerde KI, Qi G, Feldmeyer D - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Layer 3 contains adenosine-sensitive and -insensitive pyramidal neurons. (A) Left, example traces of the RMP during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow). Average response is shown in black (top, responding neurons; bottom, nonresponding neurons). Right, RMP during control and 100 μM adenosine (“ado”) conditions. (B) Morphological reconstruction of soma and dendrites and corresponding electrophysiological profile from L3 pyramidal cell subtypes. The electrophysiological response is shown when minimally 10 APs were elicited (corresponding current steps in gray). The inset shows a magnification of the first spikes (scale bar: 25 mV, 50 ms), except for bursting neurons. Here, the inset shows the typical response to medium current injections: a burst of 4–5 APs followed by silence (scale bar: 50 mV, 500 ms). (C) Adenosine-induced hyperpolarization of the RMP [RS, n = 6; broad tufted adapting (Ad), n = 3; B, bursting, n = 4; slender tufted Ad, n = 3]. (D) Left, example traces of the current across the cell membrane during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow) when the neurons were voltage clamped at −50 mV. Average response is shown in black (top, nonresponding neurons; bottom, responding neurons). Right, adenosine-induced current in nonresponding (“nonresp.”, n = 4) and responding neurons (“resp.”, n = 5). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
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BHT274F3: Layer 3 contains adenosine-sensitive and -insensitive pyramidal neurons. (A) Left, example traces of the RMP during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow). Average response is shown in black (top, responding neurons; bottom, nonresponding neurons). Right, RMP during control and 100 μM adenosine (“ado”) conditions. (B) Morphological reconstruction of soma and dendrites and corresponding electrophysiological profile from L3 pyramidal cell subtypes. The electrophysiological response is shown when minimally 10 APs were elicited (corresponding current steps in gray). The inset shows a magnification of the first spikes (scale bar: 25 mV, 50 ms), except for bursting neurons. Here, the inset shows the typical response to medium current injections: a burst of 4–5 APs followed by silence (scale bar: 50 mV, 500 ms). (C) Adenosine-induced hyperpolarization of the RMP [RS, n = 6; broad tufted adapting (Ad), n = 3; B, bursting, n = 4; slender tufted Ad, n = 3]. (D) Left, example traces of the current across the cell membrane during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow) when the neurons were voltage clamped at −50 mV. Average response is shown in black (top, nonresponding neurons; bottom, responding neurons). Right, adenosine-induced current in nonresponding (“nonresp.”, n = 4) and responding neurons (“resp.”, n = 5). *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01.
Mentions: Pyramidal cells in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex showed a high variability in response to adenosine application: About 70% of the population responded with a hyperpolarization of the RMP following adenosine application, whereas the remaining 30% was insensitive to adenosine application (Fig. 3A). Passive cell properties showed significant changes for the adenosine-sensitive neurons, but remained unchanged for the adenosine-insensitive L3 pyramidal neurons (Table 1).Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date.We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location.These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-2, D-52425 Jülich, Germany Current address: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus