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Cell type-specific effects of adenosine on cortical neurons.

van Aerde KI, Qi G, Feldmeyer D - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Bottom Line: Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date.We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location.These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-2, D-52425 Jülich, Germany Current address: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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Adenosine does not modulate L2 pyramidal neurons. (A) Left, DIC image at low magnification where pia, successive layers (L), and white matter (WM) are indicated. Note the patch pipette in left layer 2. Right, DIC image from another brain slice at higher magnification (comparable with the boxed region at the left), where layers can be particularly well recognized. (B) Morphological reconstruction of soma and dendrites from a L2 pyramidal neuron. Note the large field span of apical dendrites compared with basal dendrites. Right, electrophysiological profile: The response is shown when minimally 10 APs were elicited with the corresponding current step in gray. (C) Left, example traces of the RMP during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow). Average response is shown in black (n = 8). Right, average RMP during control (“con”) and adenosine (“ado”) conditions (n = 8, P = 0.73).
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BHT274F2: Adenosine does not modulate L2 pyramidal neurons. (A) Left, DIC image at low magnification where pia, successive layers (L), and white matter (WM) are indicated. Note the patch pipette in left layer 2. Right, DIC image from another brain slice at higher magnification (comparable with the boxed region at the left), where layers can be particularly well recognized. (B) Morphological reconstruction of soma and dendrites from a L2 pyramidal neuron. Note the large field span of apical dendrites compared with basal dendrites. Right, electrophysiological profile: The response is shown when minimally 10 APs were elicited with the corresponding current step in gray. (C) Left, example traces of the RMP during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow). Average response is shown in black (n = 8). Right, average RMP during control (“con”) and adenosine (“ado”) conditions (n = 8, P = 0.73).

Mentions: In the rat mPFC, layer 2 is clearly distinguishable from layer 3 as a thin dark band that is densely packed with neuron somata; it is located directly beneath layer 1 (Fig. 2A). Layer 2 is the thinnest layer of the prefrontal cortex containing only a few “rows” of pyramidal neurons. On a qualitative level, the density of neuron somata is lower in layer 3 than in layer 2 as can be seen at both the microscopic and macroscopic levels (Fig. 2A). Morphologically, L2 pyramidal neurons differ from L3 pyramidal neurons in the field span of their apical and basal dendrites: The apical dendritic tree of L2 pyramidal neurons has typically a much larger field span than the basal dendritic tree, whereas this ratio is smaller or reversed for L3 pyramidal neurons (Fig. 2B, see accompanying paper for more details; Van Aerde and Feldmeyer 2013).Figure 2.


Cell type-specific effects of adenosine on cortical neurons.

van Aerde KI, Qi G, Feldmeyer D - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Adenosine does not modulate L2 pyramidal neurons. (A) Left, DIC image at low magnification where pia, successive layers (L), and white matter (WM) are indicated. Note the patch pipette in left layer 2. Right, DIC image from another brain slice at higher magnification (comparable with the boxed region at the left), where layers can be particularly well recognized. (B) Morphological reconstruction of soma and dendrites from a L2 pyramidal neuron. Note the large field span of apical dendrites compared with basal dendrites. Right, electrophysiological profile: The response is shown when minimally 10 APs were elicited with the corresponding current step in gray. (C) Left, example traces of the RMP during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow). Average response is shown in black (n = 8). Right, average RMP during control (“con”) and adenosine (“ado”) conditions (n = 8, P = 0.73).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
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BHT274F2: Adenosine does not modulate L2 pyramidal neurons. (A) Left, DIC image at low magnification where pia, successive layers (L), and white matter (WM) are indicated. Note the patch pipette in left layer 2. Right, DIC image from another brain slice at higher magnification (comparable with the boxed region at the left), where layers can be particularly well recognized. (B) Morphological reconstruction of soma and dendrites from a L2 pyramidal neuron. Note the large field span of apical dendrites compared with basal dendrites. Right, electrophysiological profile: The response is shown when minimally 10 APs were elicited with the corresponding current step in gray. (C) Left, example traces of the RMP during bath application of 100 μM adenosine (start at arrow). Average response is shown in black (n = 8). Right, average RMP during control (“con”) and adenosine (“ado”) conditions (n = 8, P = 0.73).
Mentions: In the rat mPFC, layer 2 is clearly distinguishable from layer 3 as a thin dark band that is densely packed with neuron somata; it is located directly beneath layer 1 (Fig. 2A). Layer 2 is the thinnest layer of the prefrontal cortex containing only a few “rows” of pyramidal neurons. On a qualitative level, the density of neuron somata is lower in layer 3 than in layer 2 as can be seen at both the microscopic and macroscopic levels (Fig. 2A). Morphologically, L2 pyramidal neurons differ from L3 pyramidal neurons in the field span of their apical and basal dendrites: The apical dendritic tree of L2 pyramidal neurons has typically a much larger field span than the basal dendritic tree, whereas this ratio is smaller or reversed for L3 pyramidal neurons (Fig. 2B, see accompanying paper for more details; Van Aerde and Feldmeyer 2013).Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date.We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location.These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-2, D-52425 Jülich, Germany Current address: Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Science, 1105 BA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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