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Child height, health and human capital: Evidence using genetic markers.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder S, Davey Smith G, Lawlor DA, Propper C, Windmeijer F - Eur Econ Rev (2013)

Bottom Line: Height has long been recognized as being associated with better outcomes: the question is whether this association is causal.We use children's genetic variants as instrumental variables to deal with possible unobserved confounders and examine the effect of child/adolescent height on a wide range of outcomes: academic performance, IQ, self-esteem, depression symptoms and behavioral problems.The IV results differ: taller girls (but not boys) have better cognitive performance and, in contrast to the OLS, greater height appears to increase behavioral problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK ; CMPO, University of Bristol, 2 Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TX, UK.

ABSTRACT

Height has long been recognized as being associated with better outcomes: the question is whether this association is causal. We use children's genetic variants as instrumental variables to deal with possible unobserved confounders and examine the effect of child/adolescent height on a wide range of outcomes: academic performance, IQ, self-esteem, depression symptoms and behavioral problems. OLS findings show that taller children have higher IQ, perform better in school, and are less likely to have behavioral problems. The IV results differ: taller girls (but not boys) have better cognitive performance and, in contrast to the OLS, greater height appears to increase behavioral problems.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of point estimates from multiple IV models with different sets of instruments: Cognitive skills and mental health.
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f0010: Distribution of point estimates from multiple IV models with different sets of instruments: Cognitive skills and mental health.


Child height, health and human capital: Evidence using genetic markers.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder S, Davey Smith G, Lawlor DA, Propper C, Windmeijer F - Eur Econ Rev (2013)

Distribution of point estimates from multiple IV models with different sets of instruments: Cognitive skills and mental health.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318168&req=5

f0010: Distribution of point estimates from multiple IV models with different sets of instruments: Cognitive skills and mental health.
Bottom Line: Height has long been recognized as being associated with better outcomes: the question is whether this association is causal.We use children's genetic variants as instrumental variables to deal with possible unobserved confounders and examine the effect of child/adolescent height on a wide range of outcomes: academic performance, IQ, self-esteem, depression symptoms and behavioral problems.The IV results differ: taller girls (but not boys) have better cognitive performance and, in contrast to the OLS, greater height appears to increase behavioral problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK ; CMPO, University of Bristol, 2 Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TX, UK.

ABSTRACT

Height has long been recognized as being associated with better outcomes: the question is whether this association is causal. We use children's genetic variants as instrumental variables to deal with possible unobserved confounders and examine the effect of child/adolescent height on a wide range of outcomes: academic performance, IQ, self-esteem, depression symptoms and behavioral problems. OLS findings show that taller children have higher IQ, perform better in school, and are less likely to have behavioral problems. The IV results differ: taller girls (but not boys) have better cognitive performance and, in contrast to the OLS, greater height appears to increase behavioral problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus