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The need for patient-focused therapy for children and teenagers with allergic rhinitis: a case-based review of current European practice.

Santos AF, Borrego LM, Rotiroti G, Scadding G, Roberts G - Clin Transl Allergy (2015)

Bottom Line: Allergic rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence, with a negative impact on the quality of life of patients and their families.The treatment modalities for allergic rhinitis include allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory symptomatic treatment and allergen specific immunotherapy.In this review, four cases of children with allergic rhinitis are presented to illustrate how the recently published EAACI Guidelines on Pediatric Allergic Rhinitis can be implemented in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Allergy, Division of Asthma, Allergy & Lung Biology, King's College London, London, UK ; MRC & Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma, London, UK ; Immunoallergology Department, Coimbra University Hospital, Coimbra, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Allergic rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence, with a negative impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. The treatment modalities for allergic rhinitis include allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory symptomatic treatment and allergen specific immunotherapy. In this review, four cases of children with allergic rhinitis are presented to illustrate how the recently published EAACI Guidelines on Pediatric Allergic Rhinitis can be implemented in clinical practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Treatment of allergic rhinitis (7). The entry points into therapeutic approach depend on the severity of the rhinitis symptoms. Therapy can be step up or step down depending on control obtained in response to the treatment. If less than 2 years of age and do not respond to antihistamine within a week, the diagnosis should be reconsidered before stepping up therapy. *Oral antihistamines may be better tolerated, whilst intranasal antihistamines have a more rapid onset of action. **Reconsider diagnosis if not controlled within 1-2 weeks.
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Fig1: Treatment of allergic rhinitis (7). The entry points into therapeutic approach depend on the severity of the rhinitis symptoms. Therapy can be step up or step down depending on control obtained in response to the treatment. If less than 2 years of age and do not respond to antihistamine within a week, the diagnosis should be reconsidered before stepping up therapy. *Oral antihistamines may be better tolerated, whilst intranasal antihistamines have a more rapid onset of action. **Reconsider diagnosis if not controlled within 1-2 weeks.

Mentions: Allergic rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence [1]. This is partly the reason why it is often under perceived by patients and families, under diagnosed and its impact underestimated. Allergic rhinitis causes chronic disturbing symptoms which have a negative effect on physical, social and psychological well-being, as well as on school performance of children and teenagers [2-4]. There are multiple associated co-morbidities [5], which further contribute to the direct and indirect costs of rhinitis [6]. Recently, a European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) position paper on pediatric rhinitis was published to address the need for guidance on the management of this condition in the pediatric age group [7]. The main treatment modalities for pediatric allergic rhinitis include: avoidance of the relevant allergens, symptomatic treatment with H1-anti-histamines, intranasal corticosteroids and oral leukotriene-receptor antagonists, and allergen-specific immunotherapy (Figure 1). In this review article, we have used four pediatric cases to illustrate key aspects of the treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis as an exercise to help implementing the aforementioned EAACI guidelines in clinical practice.Figure 1


The need for patient-focused therapy for children and teenagers with allergic rhinitis: a case-based review of current European practice.

Santos AF, Borrego LM, Rotiroti G, Scadding G, Roberts G - Clin Transl Allergy (2015)

Treatment of allergic rhinitis (7). The entry points into therapeutic approach depend on the severity of the rhinitis symptoms. Therapy can be step up or step down depending on control obtained in response to the treatment. If less than 2 years of age and do not respond to antihistamine within a week, the diagnosis should be reconsidered before stepping up therapy. *Oral antihistamines may be better tolerated, whilst intranasal antihistamines have a more rapid onset of action. **Reconsider diagnosis if not controlled within 1-2 weeks.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318152&req=5

Fig1: Treatment of allergic rhinitis (7). The entry points into therapeutic approach depend on the severity of the rhinitis symptoms. Therapy can be step up or step down depending on control obtained in response to the treatment. If less than 2 years of age and do not respond to antihistamine within a week, the diagnosis should be reconsidered before stepping up therapy. *Oral antihistamines may be better tolerated, whilst intranasal antihistamines have a more rapid onset of action. **Reconsider diagnosis if not controlled within 1-2 weeks.
Mentions: Allergic rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence [1]. This is partly the reason why it is often under perceived by patients and families, under diagnosed and its impact underestimated. Allergic rhinitis causes chronic disturbing symptoms which have a negative effect on physical, social and psychological well-being, as well as on school performance of children and teenagers [2-4]. There are multiple associated co-morbidities [5], which further contribute to the direct and indirect costs of rhinitis [6]. Recently, a European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) position paper on pediatric rhinitis was published to address the need for guidance on the management of this condition in the pediatric age group [7]. The main treatment modalities for pediatric allergic rhinitis include: avoidance of the relevant allergens, symptomatic treatment with H1-anti-histamines, intranasal corticosteroids and oral leukotriene-receptor antagonists, and allergen-specific immunotherapy (Figure 1). In this review article, we have used four pediatric cases to illustrate key aspects of the treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis as an exercise to help implementing the aforementioned EAACI guidelines in clinical practice.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Allergic rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence, with a negative impact on the quality of life of patients and their families.The treatment modalities for allergic rhinitis include allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory symptomatic treatment and allergen specific immunotherapy.In this review, four cases of children with allergic rhinitis are presented to illustrate how the recently published EAACI Guidelines on Pediatric Allergic Rhinitis can be implemented in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Paediatric Allergy, Division of Asthma, Allergy & Lung Biology, King's College London, London, UK ; MRC & Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma, London, UK ; Immunoallergology Department, Coimbra University Hospital, Coimbra, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Allergic rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence, with a negative impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. The treatment modalities for allergic rhinitis include allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory symptomatic treatment and allergen specific immunotherapy. In this review, four cases of children with allergic rhinitis are presented to illustrate how the recently published EAACI Guidelines on Pediatric Allergic Rhinitis can be implemented in clinical practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus