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Paraneoplastic optic neuritis as the first manifestation of periampullary carcinoma.

Paul R, Ghosh AK, Sinha A, Bhattacharya R - Int J Appl Basic Med Res (2015 Jan-Apr)

Bottom Line: Prompt treatment of the malignancy is the only effective therapy for the condition.Visual loss, once established usually becomes irreversible.This is probably the first report of this association in the medical literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Medical College Kolkata, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

ABSTRACT
Paraneoplastic optic neuritis is a rare phenomenon that often presents as a diagnostic challenge. It has been mostly reported with small cell cancers or thymoma. Prompt treatment of the malignancy is the only effective therapy for the condition. Visual loss, once established usually becomes irreversible. We here report a case of paraneoplastic optic neuritis in a 40-year-old female with periampullary carcinoma. This is probably the first report of this association in the medical literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contrast enhanced computed tomography of abdomen of the patient showing a periampullary mass (yellow arrow) with ascites (red arrow) and dilated intrahepatic biliary radicles
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Figure 2: Contrast enhanced computed tomography of abdomen of the patient showing a periampullary mass (yellow arrow) with ascites (red arrow) and dilated intrahepatic biliary radicles

Mentions: Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed a mass in periampullary region with dilated bile duct radicles in liver [Figure 2]. There were few peritoneal nodules and omental thickening. No liver invasion was seen. CT guided fine-needle aspiration cytology from the mass revealed markedly dysplastic cells with hyperchromatic nuclei. Mitotic index was high. Unfortunately, just after this diagnosis, before any treatment could be started, the patient expired.


Paraneoplastic optic neuritis as the first manifestation of periampullary carcinoma.

Paul R, Ghosh AK, Sinha A, Bhattacharya R - Int J Appl Basic Med Res (2015 Jan-Apr)

Contrast enhanced computed tomography of abdomen of the patient showing a periampullary mass (yellow arrow) with ascites (red arrow) and dilated intrahepatic biliary radicles
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318110&req=5

Figure 2: Contrast enhanced computed tomography of abdomen of the patient showing a periampullary mass (yellow arrow) with ascites (red arrow) and dilated intrahepatic biliary radicles
Mentions: Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed a mass in periampullary region with dilated bile duct radicles in liver [Figure 2]. There were few peritoneal nodules and omental thickening. No liver invasion was seen. CT guided fine-needle aspiration cytology from the mass revealed markedly dysplastic cells with hyperchromatic nuclei. Mitotic index was high. Unfortunately, just after this diagnosis, before any treatment could be started, the patient expired.

Bottom Line: Prompt treatment of the malignancy is the only effective therapy for the condition.Visual loss, once established usually becomes irreversible.This is probably the first report of this association in the medical literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Medical College Kolkata, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

ABSTRACT
Paraneoplastic optic neuritis is a rare phenomenon that often presents as a diagnostic challenge. It has been mostly reported with small cell cancers or thymoma. Prompt treatment of the malignancy is the only effective therapy for the condition. Visual loss, once established usually becomes irreversible. We here report a case of paraneoplastic optic neuritis in a 40-year-old female with periampullary carcinoma. This is probably the first report of this association in the medical literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus