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Unusual case of focal neck swelling: Phlebectasia of internal jugular vein with intracranial extension.

Malik V, Kumari A, Murthy T - Int J Appl Basic Med Res (2015 Jan-Apr)

Bottom Line: Owing to the rarity of this condition, a high index of suspicion is required to recognize the same and managed appropriately.We present a case of phlebectasia of the right IJV with intracranial extension and discuss its management.The case is being reported in view of its clinical rarity (the intracranial extension being extremely rare) and to highlight the available management strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Military Hospital Gwalior, Morar Cantonment, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
Internal jugular vein (IJV) phlebectasia is rare in occurrence and is frequently misdiagnosed and managed inappropriately. It commonly presents as a unilateral neck swelling which typically increases in size with valsalva maneuver. Although, the most common cause of a focal neck swelling, which increases in size with valsalva maneuver is laryngocele, the possibility of phlebectasia of IJV should always be borne in mind, especially in child. Owing to the rarity of this condition, a high index of suspicion is required to recognize the same and managed appropriately. We present a case of phlebectasia of the right IJV with intracranial extension and discuss its management. The case is being reported in view of its clinical rarity (the intracranial extension being extremely rare) and to highlight the available management strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The swelling markedly increases in size and was fusiform in shape on performing valsalva maneuver
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Figure 1: The swelling markedly increases in size and was fusiform in shape on performing valsalva maneuver

Mentions: Physical examination at rest revealed a small soft tissue swelling on the right side of the lower third of the neck, anteromedial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The swelling markedly increases in size and was fusiform in shape on performing valsalva maneuver [Figure 1]. The swelling was soft, compressible, nontender, nonpulsatile and non transilluminant. Fibreoptic laryngoscopy revealed no abnormality in larynx and hypopharynx.


Unusual case of focal neck swelling: Phlebectasia of internal jugular vein with intracranial extension.

Malik V, Kumari A, Murthy T - Int J Appl Basic Med Res (2015 Jan-Apr)

The swelling markedly increases in size and was fusiform in shape on performing valsalva maneuver
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318104&req=5

Figure 1: The swelling markedly increases in size and was fusiform in shape on performing valsalva maneuver
Mentions: Physical examination at rest revealed a small soft tissue swelling on the right side of the lower third of the neck, anteromedial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The swelling markedly increases in size and was fusiform in shape on performing valsalva maneuver [Figure 1]. The swelling was soft, compressible, nontender, nonpulsatile and non transilluminant. Fibreoptic laryngoscopy revealed no abnormality in larynx and hypopharynx.

Bottom Line: Owing to the rarity of this condition, a high index of suspicion is required to recognize the same and managed appropriately.We present a case of phlebectasia of the right IJV with intracranial extension and discuss its management.The case is being reported in view of its clinical rarity (the intracranial extension being extremely rare) and to highlight the available management strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Military Hospital Gwalior, Morar Cantonment, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
Internal jugular vein (IJV) phlebectasia is rare in occurrence and is frequently misdiagnosed and managed inappropriately. It commonly presents as a unilateral neck swelling which typically increases in size with valsalva maneuver. Although, the most common cause of a focal neck swelling, which increases in size with valsalva maneuver is laryngocele, the possibility of phlebectasia of IJV should always be borne in mind, especially in child. Owing to the rarity of this condition, a high index of suspicion is required to recognize the same and managed appropriately. We present a case of phlebectasia of the right IJV with intracranial extension and discuss its management. The case is being reported in view of its clinical rarity (the intracranial extension being extremely rare) and to highlight the available management strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus