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Is frictional lichenoid dermatitis a minor variant of atopic dermatitis or a photodermatosis.

Sardana K, Goel K, Garg VK, Goel A, Khanna D, Grover C, Khurana N - Indian J Dermatol (2015 Jan-Feb)

Bottom Line: The number of cases seen per month was compared with the mean monthly UV index.FLE is probably not associated with atopic dermatitis and is likely to be related to the ambient UV index though a larger cohort with meticulous follow up may be needed to draw a final conclusion.P < 0.05 was considered significant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Maulana Azad Medical College and Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT

Context: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis.

Background: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis (FLE) is an entity that is probably under diagnosed and has been variably associated with either friction and/or atopy with a distinctive seasonal variation.

Aims and objectives: To study correlation of FLE with UV index and to assess its association with atopic dermatitis.

Materials and methods: A cross sectional analysis of children with FLE was done, over a period of 6 years in two tertiary hospitals. A detailed history and examination was done to assess the features of atopic dermatitis. The number of cases seen per month was compared with the mean monthly UV index. Two-tailed significance tests using Pearson's coefficient of correlation and T-test were used to interpret the data. (P < 0.05).

Results: One hundred seventy-four patients were studied using the UKC criterion 17.2% of the patients had AD while xerosis (40.3%) was the predominant cutaneous finding. The number of patients seen in summer was more than in winter (P < 0.05) but there was no statistical difference between the cases in winter and spring. There was a significant correlation of the number of cases per month with UV index (P = 0.019). Almost 42% of patients gave a history of recurrence.

Conclusions: FLE is probably not associated with atopic dermatitis and is likely to be related to the ambient UV index though a larger cohort with meticulous follow up may be needed to draw a final conclusion.

Statistical analysis used: The Pearson's coefficient of correlation was used for comparing the cases per month with the UV index. The tests of hypothesis used included the paired T-tests. F-test of variance, Welch test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test. P < 0.05 was considered significant.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Differential of Follicular/Lichenoid papular lesions localized to the extensors.* The spine is the most prominent feature as the lesions are small. The spine can be dislodged leaving the papule intact.** The follicular prominence is known as the antenna sign, removal of the spine classically reveals a “coiled up” hair in the papule.*** The other terminology used includes patchy pityriasiform lichenoid eczema, follicular variant of atopic dermatitis and papular eczema.
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Figure 1: Differential of Follicular/Lichenoid papular lesions localized to the extensors.* The spine is the most prominent feature as the lesions are small. The spine can be dislodged leaving the papule intact.** The follicular prominence is known as the antenna sign, removal of the spine classically reveals a “coiled up” hair in the papule.*** The other terminology used includes patchy pityriasiform lichenoid eczema, follicular variant of atopic dermatitis and papular eczema.

Mentions: A cross sectional analysis of all children with FLE was undertaken from January 2005 to November 2012 at the Dermatology outpatient department of two tertiary care hospitals. All cases with a mildly symptomatic eruption composed of discrete closely aggregated lichenoid papules with occasional scaling on the extensors were included. An algorithm was used to exclude other similar looking dermatoses [Figure 1]. The characteristic localization, morphology and seasonal recurrence ruled out other conditions like Gianotti-Crosti syndrome and id eruption. As id eruption consequent to infective foci is common, an attempt was made to look for any primary cutaneous fungal, viral or bacterial infection. The morphological diagnosis was based largely on the clinical description by Waisman.[2] The dermatoses was graded as mild moderate or severe [Table 3][27] Biopsy confirmation was done only in atypical cases. Apart from recording the epidemiological data the month of presentation was noted in all cases. A specific history of previous episodes was taken to assess whether the condition recurred. We used the UVI which is an linear irradiance scale and usually ranges from 0 to 16.[1819]


Is frictional lichenoid dermatitis a minor variant of atopic dermatitis or a photodermatosis.

Sardana K, Goel K, Garg VK, Goel A, Khanna D, Grover C, Khurana N - Indian J Dermatol (2015 Jan-Feb)

Differential of Follicular/Lichenoid papular lesions localized to the extensors.* The spine is the most prominent feature as the lesions are small. The spine can be dislodged leaving the papule intact.** The follicular prominence is known as the antenna sign, removal of the spine classically reveals a “coiled up” hair in the papule.*** The other terminology used includes patchy pityriasiform lichenoid eczema, follicular variant of atopic dermatitis and papular eczema.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318066&req=5

Figure 1: Differential of Follicular/Lichenoid papular lesions localized to the extensors.* The spine is the most prominent feature as the lesions are small. The spine can be dislodged leaving the papule intact.** The follicular prominence is known as the antenna sign, removal of the spine classically reveals a “coiled up” hair in the papule.*** The other terminology used includes patchy pityriasiform lichenoid eczema, follicular variant of atopic dermatitis and papular eczema.
Mentions: A cross sectional analysis of all children with FLE was undertaken from January 2005 to November 2012 at the Dermatology outpatient department of two tertiary care hospitals. All cases with a mildly symptomatic eruption composed of discrete closely aggregated lichenoid papules with occasional scaling on the extensors were included. An algorithm was used to exclude other similar looking dermatoses [Figure 1]. The characteristic localization, morphology and seasonal recurrence ruled out other conditions like Gianotti-Crosti syndrome and id eruption. As id eruption consequent to infective foci is common, an attempt was made to look for any primary cutaneous fungal, viral or bacterial infection. The morphological diagnosis was based largely on the clinical description by Waisman.[2] The dermatoses was graded as mild moderate or severe [Table 3][27] Biopsy confirmation was done only in atypical cases. Apart from recording the epidemiological data the month of presentation was noted in all cases. A specific history of previous episodes was taken to assess whether the condition recurred. We used the UVI which is an linear irradiance scale and usually ranges from 0 to 16.[1819]

Bottom Line: The number of cases seen per month was compared with the mean monthly UV index.FLE is probably not associated with atopic dermatitis and is likely to be related to the ambient UV index though a larger cohort with meticulous follow up may be needed to draw a final conclusion.P < 0.05 was considered significant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Maulana Azad Medical College and Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT

Context: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis.

Background: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis (FLE) is an entity that is probably under diagnosed and has been variably associated with either friction and/or atopy with a distinctive seasonal variation.

Aims and objectives: To study correlation of FLE with UV index and to assess its association with atopic dermatitis.

Materials and methods: A cross sectional analysis of children with FLE was done, over a period of 6 years in two tertiary hospitals. A detailed history and examination was done to assess the features of atopic dermatitis. The number of cases seen per month was compared with the mean monthly UV index. Two-tailed significance tests using Pearson's coefficient of correlation and T-test were used to interpret the data. (P < 0.05).

Results: One hundred seventy-four patients were studied using the UKC criterion 17.2% of the patients had AD while xerosis (40.3%) was the predominant cutaneous finding. The number of patients seen in summer was more than in winter (P < 0.05) but there was no statistical difference between the cases in winter and spring. There was a significant correlation of the number of cases per month with UV index (P = 0.019). Almost 42% of patients gave a history of recurrence.

Conclusions: FLE is probably not associated with atopic dermatitis and is likely to be related to the ambient UV index though a larger cohort with meticulous follow up may be needed to draw a final conclusion.

Statistical analysis used: The Pearson's coefficient of correlation was used for comparing the cases per month with the UV index. The tests of hypothesis used included the paired T-tests. F-test of variance, Welch test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test. P < 0.05 was considered significant.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus