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Topical adapalene in the treatment of plantar warts; randomized comparative open trial in comparison with cryo-therapy.

Gupta R, Gupta S - Indian J Dermatol (2015 Jan-Feb)

Bottom Line: Patients were allocated randomly into two groups consisting of 25 patients each.There were no side effects like scar formation, irritation, erythema, or infections with adapalene group while in the cryo group scar was seen in 2 patients, pain in 24, erythema in 10, and infection in 3 patients.Adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion is an effective, safe and easy to use treatment for plantar warts and may help clear lesions faster than cryo-therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, Sarita Vihar, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Various therapeutic modalities, which are available for treating plantar wart, have not been successful every time.

Aims: To evaluate topical adapalene under occlusion in the treatment of plantar warts and compare it with cryo-therapy.

Materials and methods: 50 patients with 424 plantar warts were included in this single center, two arm, prospective, randomized, control, open study. Patients were allocated randomly into two groups consisting of 25 patients each. Group A patients having 299 plantar warts were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion while Group B patients having 125 warts were treated using cryo-therapy. All the patients were evaluated weekly till the clearance of all the warts and the results compared.

Result: All the warts of 25 patients of Group A that were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% cleared in 36.71 ± 19.24 (55.95-17.47) days except those in one patient. In Group B, warts in all except one treated by cryo-therapy cleared in 52.17 ± 30.06 (82.23-22.11) days. There were no side effects like scar formation, irritation, erythema, or infections with adapalene group while in the cryo group scar was seen in 2 patients, pain in 24, erythema in 10, and infection in 3 patients.

Conclusion: Adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion is an effective, safe and easy to use treatment for plantar warts and may help clear lesions faster than cryo-therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Plantar warts after treatment
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Figure 2: Plantar warts after treatment

Mentions: Fifty patients with 424 plantar warts were included in this single center, two arm, prospective, randomized, control, and open study. Diagnosis of plantar warts was made based on clinical presentation like rough surface, well-defined border [Figure 1] and pain on pressure. Informed consent was taken from all the patients after explaining in details about the purpose and procedure of the treatment. Healthy patients with plantar warts were included in the study. Those patients who were on any systemic therapy in the past 8 weeks and pregnant women were excluded from the study. All topical treatment was stopped 4 weeks prior to the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two treatment groups: Group A (Adapalene 0.1% gel) and Group B (cryo- therapy, very commonly used therapy for plantar warts in this part of country). Comparison was not done with placebo due to fear that many patients may drop during follow-up due to ineffectiveness. All the odd numbered patients, who came to the outpatient department, were allocated to Group A, while all the even numbered patients were allocated to Group B. Thus, 25 patients who were allocated to Group A were treated with topical adapalene 0.1% gel applied twice daily under occlusion using plastic wrap while another 25 patients who were allocated to Group B were treated with cryo-therapy for1-2 minutes using N2O gas operated machine with −94°C temperature. Cryo-therapy was repeated within 2 weeks, if there were no signs of improvements in the form of reduction in the pain and/or development of black spots. Once there was improvement, they were followed up for clearance without any cryo sitting. In both the groups, hyperkeratosis or thick areas were pared before doing cryo-therapy or applying adapalene gel. Thus paring was done initially during treatment. The treatment was continued till the clearance of all the warts [Figure 2] in both the groups. The effect of treatment was evaluated weekly till the clearance of all the warts, followed by monthly evaluation for at least 6 months for any recurrences.


Topical adapalene in the treatment of plantar warts; randomized comparative open trial in comparison with cryo-therapy.

Gupta R, Gupta S - Indian J Dermatol (2015 Jan-Feb)

Plantar warts after treatment
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4318023&req=5

Figure 2: Plantar warts after treatment
Mentions: Fifty patients with 424 plantar warts were included in this single center, two arm, prospective, randomized, control, and open study. Diagnosis of plantar warts was made based on clinical presentation like rough surface, well-defined border [Figure 1] and pain on pressure. Informed consent was taken from all the patients after explaining in details about the purpose and procedure of the treatment. Healthy patients with plantar warts were included in the study. Those patients who were on any systemic therapy in the past 8 weeks and pregnant women were excluded from the study. All topical treatment was stopped 4 weeks prior to the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two treatment groups: Group A (Adapalene 0.1% gel) and Group B (cryo- therapy, very commonly used therapy for plantar warts in this part of country). Comparison was not done with placebo due to fear that many patients may drop during follow-up due to ineffectiveness. All the odd numbered patients, who came to the outpatient department, were allocated to Group A, while all the even numbered patients were allocated to Group B. Thus, 25 patients who were allocated to Group A were treated with topical adapalene 0.1% gel applied twice daily under occlusion using plastic wrap while another 25 patients who were allocated to Group B were treated with cryo-therapy for1-2 minutes using N2O gas operated machine with −94°C temperature. Cryo-therapy was repeated within 2 weeks, if there were no signs of improvements in the form of reduction in the pain and/or development of black spots. Once there was improvement, they were followed up for clearance without any cryo sitting. In both the groups, hyperkeratosis or thick areas were pared before doing cryo-therapy or applying adapalene gel. Thus paring was done initially during treatment. The treatment was continued till the clearance of all the warts [Figure 2] in both the groups. The effect of treatment was evaluated weekly till the clearance of all the warts, followed by monthly evaluation for at least 6 months for any recurrences.

Bottom Line: Patients were allocated randomly into two groups consisting of 25 patients each.There were no side effects like scar formation, irritation, erythema, or infections with adapalene group while in the cryo group scar was seen in 2 patients, pain in 24, erythema in 10, and infection in 3 patients.Adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion is an effective, safe and easy to use treatment for plantar warts and may help clear lesions faster than cryo-therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, Sarita Vihar, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Various therapeutic modalities, which are available for treating plantar wart, have not been successful every time.

Aims: To evaluate topical adapalene under occlusion in the treatment of plantar warts and compare it with cryo-therapy.

Materials and methods: 50 patients with 424 plantar warts were included in this single center, two arm, prospective, randomized, control, open study. Patients were allocated randomly into two groups consisting of 25 patients each. Group A patients having 299 plantar warts were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion while Group B patients having 125 warts were treated using cryo-therapy. All the patients were evaluated weekly till the clearance of all the warts and the results compared.

Result: All the warts of 25 patients of Group A that were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% cleared in 36.71 ± 19.24 (55.95-17.47) days except those in one patient. In Group B, warts in all except one treated by cryo-therapy cleared in 52.17 ± 30.06 (82.23-22.11) days. There were no side effects like scar formation, irritation, erythema, or infections with adapalene group while in the cryo group scar was seen in 2 patients, pain in 24, erythema in 10, and infection in 3 patients.

Conclusion: Adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion is an effective, safe and easy to use treatment for plantar warts and may help clear lesions faster than cryo-therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus