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Incidence of multiple primary cancers and interval between first and second primary cancers.

Utada M, Ohno Y, Hori M, Soda M - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: A second primary cancer developed in 14 167 of 174 477 subjects (8.1%) during a median follow-up of 1.8 years.Some specific relationships were observed between sites with risk factors in common, such as smoking, drinking, and hormone status.The SIRs were relatively high after approximately 10 years for all sites, and trends differ among cancer sites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematical Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.

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Trends in standardized incidence ratio (SIR) after diagnosis of first primary cancers by sites, according to inclusion (filled circles) or exclusion (hollow circles) of second primary cancers diagnosed within less than 3 months of the first.
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fig02: Trends in standardized incidence ratio (SIR) after diagnosis of first primary cancers by sites, according to inclusion (filled circles) or exclusion (hollow circles) of second primary cancers diagnosed within less than 3 months of the first.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the trends in SIRs after diagnosis of first primary cancers according to cancer sites. The SIRs in the first year were high for all sites of cancer, decreasing when we excluded second primary cancers diagnosed within less than 3 months of the first primary cancer. The trends differed among cancer sites. The SIRs for stomach showed the same tendency as all sites combined; namely, decreasing in the second year, continued to increase after the second year, relatively high in approximately 10 years, and decreasing after 20 years. Those for liver, pancreas, lung, or prostate were consistently lower than 1. In some sites, including larynx, breast in female subjects, uterus, or blood, the SIRs were relatively high a few years after diagnosis of the first primary cancer, and even after 10 years.


Incidence of multiple primary cancers and interval between first and second primary cancers.

Utada M, Ohno Y, Hori M, Soda M - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Trends in standardized incidence ratio (SIR) after diagnosis of first primary cancers by sites, according to inclusion (filled circles) or exclusion (hollow circles) of second primary cancers diagnosed within less than 3 months of the first.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317925&req=5

fig02: Trends in standardized incidence ratio (SIR) after diagnosis of first primary cancers by sites, according to inclusion (filled circles) or exclusion (hollow circles) of second primary cancers diagnosed within less than 3 months of the first.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the trends in SIRs after diagnosis of first primary cancers according to cancer sites. The SIRs in the first year were high for all sites of cancer, decreasing when we excluded second primary cancers diagnosed within less than 3 months of the first primary cancer. The trends differed among cancer sites. The SIRs for stomach showed the same tendency as all sites combined; namely, decreasing in the second year, continued to increase after the second year, relatively high in approximately 10 years, and decreasing after 20 years. Those for liver, pancreas, lung, or prostate were consistently lower than 1. In some sites, including larynx, breast in female subjects, uterus, or blood, the SIRs were relatively high a few years after diagnosis of the first primary cancer, and even after 10 years.

Bottom Line: A second primary cancer developed in 14 167 of 174 477 subjects (8.1%) during a median follow-up of 1.8 years.Some specific relationships were observed between sites with risk factors in common, such as smoking, drinking, and hormone status.The SIRs were relatively high after approximately 10 years for all sites, and trends differ among cancer sites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematical Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus