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Phase II trial of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel as second-line chemotherapy for unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer.

Sasaki Y, Nishina T, Yasui H, Goto M, Muro K, Tsuji A, Koizumi W, Toh Y, Hara T, Miyata Y - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.4-3.6) and 9.2 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.4), respectively.The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (49.1%), leucopenia (20.0%), lymphopenia (10.9%), and peripheral sensory neuropathy (23.6%).There were no treatment-related deaths.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka-shi, Japan; Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Showa University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

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Kaplan–Meier plots of overall survival in the full analysis set of patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer receiving nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel as second-line therapy.
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fig03: Kaplan–Meier plots of overall survival in the full analysis set of patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer receiving nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel as second-line therapy.

Mentions: The median PFS was 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.4–3.6 months), with a median follow-up time of 280 days (range, 46–1030 days; Fig. 2). The median survival time was 9.2 months (95% CI, 6.9–11.4 months) (Fig. 3). The median duration of treatment was 79.5 days (range, 22–477 days), with a median cumulative dose of 1574.5 mg (range, 387–6319 mg). Although 19 (34.5%) and 20 (36.4%) patients required dose reductions and delays, respectively, the mean relative dose intensity was 93.4% (range, 63.6–100.0%). Additional chemotherapy was given to the 44 (81.5%) patients in whom treatment with nab-paclitaxel failed, of whom, 37 (68.5%) received irinotecan-based chemotherapy (Table 3).


Phase II trial of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel as second-line chemotherapy for unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer.

Sasaki Y, Nishina T, Yasui H, Goto M, Muro K, Tsuji A, Koizumi W, Toh Y, Hara T, Miyata Y - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Kaplan–Meier plots of overall survival in the full analysis set of patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer receiving nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel as second-line therapy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317911&req=5

fig03: Kaplan–Meier plots of overall survival in the full analysis set of patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer receiving nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel as second-line therapy.
Mentions: The median PFS was 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.4–3.6 months), with a median follow-up time of 280 days (range, 46–1030 days; Fig. 2). The median survival time was 9.2 months (95% CI, 6.9–11.4 months) (Fig. 3). The median duration of treatment was 79.5 days (range, 22–477 days), with a median cumulative dose of 1574.5 mg (range, 387–6319 mg). Although 19 (34.5%) and 20 (36.4%) patients required dose reductions and delays, respectively, the mean relative dose intensity was 93.4% (range, 63.6–100.0%). Additional chemotherapy was given to the 44 (81.5%) patients in whom treatment with nab-paclitaxel failed, of whom, 37 (68.5%) received irinotecan-based chemotherapy (Table 3).

Bottom Line: The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.4-3.6) and 9.2 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.4), respectively.The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (49.1%), leucopenia (20.0%), lymphopenia (10.9%), and peripheral sensory neuropathy (23.6%).There were no treatment-related deaths.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka-shi, Japan; Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Showa University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus