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Serum carotenoid levels and risk of lung cancer death in US adults.

Min KB, Min JY - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Although much attention has been focused on the anti-carcinogenic effect of consuming carotenoid-containing food or supplements, the results have been inconsistent.We found that high serum levels of alpha-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin at baseline were significantly associated with a lower risk of lung cancer death.When we stratified the risk by current smoking status, the risk of death of current smokers was significantly decreased to 46% (95% confidence interval, 31-94%) for alpha-carotene and 61% (95% confidence interval, 19-80%) for beta-cryptoxanthin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of serum carotenoids by current smoking status (current smokers vs never/former smokers): (a) Alpha-carotene; (b) beta-carotene; (c) beta-cryptoxanthin, (d) lycopene and (e) lutein/zeaxanthin.
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fig01: Distribution of serum carotenoids by current smoking status (current smokers vs never/former smokers): (a) Alpha-carotene; (b) beta-carotene; (c) beta-cryptoxanthin, (d) lycopene and (e) lutein/zeaxanthin.

Mentions: Figure1 presents the distribution of serum carotenoid levels according to smoking status (current smokers vs never/former smokers) at baseline. Compared with current non-smokers, including never and former smokers, current smokers had relatively lower serum carotenoid levels. There were significant differences between current smokers and never/former smokers in the median levels of alpha-carotene (4.4 μg/dL vs 3.5 μg/dL, respectively), beta-cryptoxanthin (10.5 μg/dL vs 7.4 μg/dL, respectively) and lycopene (22.5 μg/dL vs 17.4 μg/dL, respectively).


Serum carotenoid levels and risk of lung cancer death in US adults.

Min KB, Min JY - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Distribution of serum carotenoids by current smoking status (current smokers vs never/former smokers): (a) Alpha-carotene; (b) beta-carotene; (c) beta-cryptoxanthin, (d) lycopene and (e) lutein/zeaxanthin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317899&req=5

fig01: Distribution of serum carotenoids by current smoking status (current smokers vs never/former smokers): (a) Alpha-carotene; (b) beta-carotene; (c) beta-cryptoxanthin, (d) lycopene and (e) lutein/zeaxanthin.
Mentions: Figure1 presents the distribution of serum carotenoid levels according to smoking status (current smokers vs never/former smokers) at baseline. Compared with current non-smokers, including never and former smokers, current smokers had relatively lower serum carotenoid levels. There were significant differences between current smokers and never/former smokers in the median levels of alpha-carotene (4.4 μg/dL vs 3.5 μg/dL, respectively), beta-cryptoxanthin (10.5 μg/dL vs 7.4 μg/dL, respectively) and lycopene (22.5 μg/dL vs 17.4 μg/dL, respectively).

Bottom Line: Although much attention has been focused on the anti-carcinogenic effect of consuming carotenoid-containing food or supplements, the results have been inconsistent.We found that high serum levels of alpha-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin at baseline were significantly associated with a lower risk of lung cancer death.When we stratified the risk by current smoking status, the risk of death of current smokers was significantly decreased to 46% (95% confidence interval, 31-94%) for alpha-carotene and 61% (95% confidence interval, 19-80%) for beta-cryptoxanthin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus