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Meta-analysis comparing higher and lower dose radiotherapy for palliation in locally advanced lung cancer.

Ma JT, Zheng JH, Han CB, Guo QY - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: The combined odds ratios (ORs) indicated no significant difference in palliation of cough, chest pain, and hemoptysis between the higher dose and lower dose RT groups (combined ORs = 0.88, 1.83, 1.39, respectively).The 1- and 2-year OS rates were similar between the high and low dose RT groups (combined ORs = 1.09 and 1.38, respectively).This meta-analysis indicates that high dose (≥30 Gy) and lower dose (<30 Gy) RT provide similar symptom palliation and 1- and 2-year OS in patients with locally advanced lung cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China.

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Results of the sensitivity analysis to examine the influence of individual studies on pooled estimates for the primary outcome of palliation of symptoms as determined using the leave-one-out approach. (a) Cough; (b) chest pain; (c) hemoptysis. CI, confidence interval.
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fig04: Results of the sensitivity analysis to examine the influence of individual studies on pooled estimates for the primary outcome of palliation of symptoms as determined using the leave-one-out approach. (a) Cough; (b) chest pain; (c) hemoptysis. CI, confidence interval.

Mentions: The results of the sensitivity analyses, in which the studies were omitted one-by-one, are summarized in Figure 4. For palliation of cough (Fig. 4a) and chest pain (Fig. 4b), the direction and magnitude of the pooled estimate did not vary markedly with the removal of any study, which indicates good reliability in this meta-analysis. However, for palliation of hemoptysis (Fig. 4c), the removal of the study by Macbeth et al.(16) caused the pooled OR to change from non-significant (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 0.60–3.20, P = 0.437) to significant (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.11–3.36, P = 0.021).


Meta-analysis comparing higher and lower dose radiotherapy for palliation in locally advanced lung cancer.

Ma JT, Zheng JH, Han CB, Guo QY - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Results of the sensitivity analysis to examine the influence of individual studies on pooled estimates for the primary outcome of palliation of symptoms as determined using the leave-one-out approach. (a) Cough; (b) chest pain; (c) hemoptysis. CI, confidence interval.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317848&req=5

fig04: Results of the sensitivity analysis to examine the influence of individual studies on pooled estimates for the primary outcome of palliation of symptoms as determined using the leave-one-out approach. (a) Cough; (b) chest pain; (c) hemoptysis. CI, confidence interval.
Mentions: The results of the sensitivity analyses, in which the studies were omitted one-by-one, are summarized in Figure 4. For palliation of cough (Fig. 4a) and chest pain (Fig. 4b), the direction and magnitude of the pooled estimate did not vary markedly with the removal of any study, which indicates good reliability in this meta-analysis. However, for palliation of hemoptysis (Fig. 4c), the removal of the study by Macbeth et al.(16) caused the pooled OR to change from non-significant (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 0.60–3.20, P = 0.437) to significant (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.11–3.36, P = 0.021).

Bottom Line: The combined odds ratios (ORs) indicated no significant difference in palliation of cough, chest pain, and hemoptysis between the higher dose and lower dose RT groups (combined ORs = 0.88, 1.83, 1.39, respectively).The 1- and 2-year OS rates were similar between the high and low dose RT groups (combined ORs = 1.09 and 1.38, respectively).This meta-analysis indicates that high dose (≥30 Gy) and lower dose (<30 Gy) RT provide similar symptom palliation and 1- and 2-year OS in patients with locally advanced lung cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus