Limits...
Bortezomib therapy-related lung disease in Japanese patients with multiple myeloma: incidence, mortality and clinical characterization.

Yoshizawa K, Mukai HY, Miyazawa M, Miyao M, Ogawa Y, Ohyashiki K, Katoh T, Kusumoto M, Gemma A, Sakai F, Sugiyama Y, Hatake K, Fukuda Y, Kudoh S - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: A retrospective review by the Lung Injury Medical Expert Panel revealed that the types with capillary leak syndrome and hypoxia without infiltrative shadows were uniquely and frequently observed in patients with BILD compared with those with conditions associated with other molecular-targeted anticancer drugs.The incidence rate of BILD in Japan remains high compared with that reported in other countries, but the incidence and mortality rates are lower than expected before the introduction of bortezomib in Japan.The RMAP seemed clinically effective in minimizing the BILD risk among our Japanese population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Medical Affairs, Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K., Tokyo, Japan.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of the case selection for analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317820&req=5

fig01: Flow diagram of the case selection for analysis.

Mentions: In total, nine of the 45 patients with physician-reported BILD were excluded because of insufficient data, and the remaining 36 patients were evaluated for causality by the Lung Injury Medical Expert Panel (Fig. 1). In 26 of these patients, positive causality between bortezomib use and BILD was noted. Thus, the estimated concordance rate of causality between physician-reported BILD and that defined by the panel was 72.2% (95% CI, 56.0–84.2%). Most events in the remaining 10 patients appeared to be the consequence of heart failure and/or infections: heart failure (n = 1); heart failure complicated with pneumonia (n = 3); pneumonia (n = 3); bronchitis (n = 2); and transient hypoxia caused by loxoprofen sodium hydrate (n = 1).


Bortezomib therapy-related lung disease in Japanese patients with multiple myeloma: incidence, mortality and clinical characterization.

Yoshizawa K, Mukai HY, Miyazawa M, Miyao M, Ogawa Y, Ohyashiki K, Katoh T, Kusumoto M, Gemma A, Sakai F, Sugiyama Y, Hatake K, Fukuda Y, Kudoh S - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Flow diagram of the case selection for analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317820&req=5

fig01: Flow diagram of the case selection for analysis.
Mentions: In total, nine of the 45 patients with physician-reported BILD were excluded because of insufficient data, and the remaining 36 patients were evaluated for causality by the Lung Injury Medical Expert Panel (Fig. 1). In 26 of these patients, positive causality between bortezomib use and BILD was noted. Thus, the estimated concordance rate of causality between physician-reported BILD and that defined by the panel was 72.2% (95% CI, 56.0–84.2%). Most events in the remaining 10 patients appeared to be the consequence of heart failure and/or infections: heart failure (n = 1); heart failure complicated with pneumonia (n = 3); pneumonia (n = 3); bronchitis (n = 2); and transient hypoxia caused by loxoprofen sodium hydrate (n = 1).

Bottom Line: A retrospective review by the Lung Injury Medical Expert Panel revealed that the types with capillary leak syndrome and hypoxia without infiltrative shadows were uniquely and frequently observed in patients with BILD compared with those with conditions associated with other molecular-targeted anticancer drugs.The incidence rate of BILD in Japan remains high compared with that reported in other countries, but the incidence and mortality rates are lower than expected before the introduction of bortezomib in Japan.The RMAP seemed clinically effective in minimizing the BILD risk among our Japanese population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Medical Affairs, Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K., Tokyo, Japan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus