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Clinical significance of macrophage heterogeneity in human malignant tumors.

Komohara Y, Jinushi M, Takeya M - Cancer Sci. (2013)

Bottom Line: The fact that various immune cells, including macrophages, can be found in tumor tissue has long been known.With the recent introduction of the novel concept of macrophage differentiation into a classically activated phenotype (M1) and an alternatively activated phenotype (M2), the role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is gradually beginning to be elucidated.Specifically, in human malignant tumors, TAMs that have differentiated into M2 macrophages act as "protumoral macrophages" and contribute to the progression of disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.

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Tumor thrombosis. Mitosis (M), cluster of carcinoma cells in a vein vessel (V) and thrombus of tumor cells (Th).
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fig03: Tumor thrombosis. Mitosis (M), cluster of carcinoma cells in a vein vessel (V) and thrombus of tumor cells (Th).

Mentions: The abovementioned experimental instruction was quite simple. Our experiments demanded only extraordinary patience for a period of years. The dried tar crust produced by the repeated tar painting was removed with the tweezers every time, so the epithelial plug and newly made or dilated capillaries were often disrupted, and small amounts of bleeding and superficial tissue defect occurred. To avoid the boring repetition of the study, the main results will be presented later in the tables. (Note that a summary of the experiment series I–IV is in Table VI, and the representative figures of the experiments are Figs 6, 9, and 31.)


Clinical significance of macrophage heterogeneity in human malignant tumors.

Komohara Y, Jinushi M, Takeya M - Cancer Sci. (2013)

Tumor thrombosis. Mitosis (M), cluster of carcinoma cells in a vein vessel (V) and thrombus of tumor cells (Th).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317818&req=5

fig03: Tumor thrombosis. Mitosis (M), cluster of carcinoma cells in a vein vessel (V) and thrombus of tumor cells (Th).
Mentions: The abovementioned experimental instruction was quite simple. Our experiments demanded only extraordinary patience for a period of years. The dried tar crust produced by the repeated tar painting was removed with the tweezers every time, so the epithelial plug and newly made or dilated capillaries were often disrupted, and small amounts of bleeding and superficial tissue defect occurred. To avoid the boring repetition of the study, the main results will be presented later in the tables. (Note that a summary of the experiment series I–IV is in Table VI, and the representative figures of the experiments are Figs 6, 9, and 31.)

Bottom Line: The fact that various immune cells, including macrophages, can be found in tumor tissue has long been known.With the recent introduction of the novel concept of macrophage differentiation into a classically activated phenotype (M1) and an alternatively activated phenotype (M2), the role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is gradually beginning to be elucidated.Specifically, in human malignant tumors, TAMs that have differentiated into M2 macrophages act as "protumoral macrophages" and contribute to the progression of disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus