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Human papillomavirus and p53 mutations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma among Japanese population.

Maruyama H, Yasui T, Ishikawa-Fujiwara T, Morii E, Yamamoto Y, Yoshii T, Takenaka Y, Nakahara S, Todo T, Hongyo T, Inohara H - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Oropharyngeal carcinoma was more frequently HPV-positive than non-oropharyngeal carcinoma (34.4% vs 3.6%, P < 0.001), and HPV16 accounted for 91.1% of HPV-positive tumors.In oropharyngeal carcinoma, which showed an increasing trend of HPV prevalence over time (P < 0.001), HPV infection was inversely correlated with tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, p53 mutations, and a disruptive mutation (P = 0.003, <0.001, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively).A disruptive mutation was never found in virus-related HNSCC, whereas it was independently associated with primary site, such as the oropharynx and hypopharynx (P = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively), in virus-unrelated HNSCC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Suita, Japan.

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Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in carcinomas of the palatine and lingual tonsils across three calendar periods (1995–1999, 2000–2009, and 2010–2012). An increasing trend was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The number of specimens evaluable for each assay is shown below the x-axis.
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fig01: Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in carcinomas of the palatine and lingual tonsils across three calendar periods (1995–1999, 2000–2009, and 2010–2012). An increasing trend was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The number of specimens evaluable for each assay is shown below the x-axis.

Mentions: As HPV-positive tumors were specific to the palatine and lingual tonsils among subsites of the oropharynx, we addressed the chronological change of HPV prevalence in oropharyngeal carcinoma originating from these subsites. Prevalence of HPV was increased from 36.8% during 1995 to 1999, 39.0% during 2000 to 2009, to 48.3% during 2010 to 2012 (Fig. 1). This increasing trend across calendar periods was statistically significant (P < 0.001).


Human papillomavirus and p53 mutations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma among Japanese population.

Maruyama H, Yasui T, Ishikawa-Fujiwara T, Morii E, Yamamoto Y, Yoshii T, Takenaka Y, Nakahara S, Todo T, Hongyo T, Inohara H - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in carcinomas of the palatine and lingual tonsils across three calendar periods (1995–1999, 2000–2009, and 2010–2012). An increasing trend was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The number of specimens evaluable for each assay is shown below the x-axis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317800&req=5

fig01: Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in carcinomas of the palatine and lingual tonsils across three calendar periods (1995–1999, 2000–2009, and 2010–2012). An increasing trend was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The number of specimens evaluable for each assay is shown below the x-axis.
Mentions: As HPV-positive tumors were specific to the palatine and lingual tonsils among subsites of the oropharynx, we addressed the chronological change of HPV prevalence in oropharyngeal carcinoma originating from these subsites. Prevalence of HPV was increased from 36.8% during 1995 to 1999, 39.0% during 2000 to 2009, to 48.3% during 2010 to 2012 (Fig. 1). This increasing trend across calendar periods was statistically significant (P < 0.001).

Bottom Line: Oropharyngeal carcinoma was more frequently HPV-positive than non-oropharyngeal carcinoma (34.4% vs 3.6%, P < 0.001), and HPV16 accounted for 91.1% of HPV-positive tumors.In oropharyngeal carcinoma, which showed an increasing trend of HPV prevalence over time (P < 0.001), HPV infection was inversely correlated with tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, p53 mutations, and a disruptive mutation (P = 0.003, <0.001, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively).A disruptive mutation was never found in virus-related HNSCC, whereas it was independently associated with primary site, such as the oropharynx and hypopharynx (P = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively), in virus-unrelated HNSCC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Suita, Japan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus