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Determinants of participation in prostate cancer screening: a simple analytical framework to account for healthy-user bias.

Tabuchi T, Nakayama T, Fukushima W, Matsunaga I, Ohfuji S, Kondo K, Kawano E, Fukuhara H, Ito Y, Oshima A - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Men who were older (prevalence ratio [PR] [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 2.17 [1.43, 3.28] for 60-64 years compared with 40-49 years), had technical or junior college education (PR [95% CI] = 1.76 [1.19, 2.59] compared with men with high school or less) and followed doctors' recommendations (PR [95% CI] = 1.50 [1.00, 2.26]) were significantly more likely to have PSA-screening after multiple variable adjustment among cancer-screening responders.Attenuation in PR of hypothesized common factors was observed among cancer-screening responders compared with the usual approach (among total subjects).Using the analytical framework to account for healthy-user bias, we found three factors related to participation in PSA-screening with attenuated association of common factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Cancer Control and Statistics, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka, Japan; Urban Research Plaza, Osaka City University, Osaka, Japan.

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Flow diagram for selection of analyzed men. FOBT, fecal occult blood testing; PSA, prostate-specific antigen.
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fig02: Flow diagram for selection of analyzed men. FOBT, fecal occult blood testing; PSA, prostate-specific antigen.

Mentions: Among men aged 40–64 years (n = 966), men who had had a diagnosis of colorectal or prostate cancer to date (n = 7 for colorectum and n = 3 for prostate), or had missing data for FOBT (n = 11) or PSA testing (n = 18) were excluded. The remaining 936 men were analyzed as total subjects (Fig.2). In an analytical framework to account for healthy-user bias, only responders for cancer screening (n = 464) were analyzed.


Determinants of participation in prostate cancer screening: a simple analytical framework to account for healthy-user bias.

Tabuchi T, Nakayama T, Fukushima W, Matsunaga I, Ohfuji S, Kondo K, Kawano E, Fukuhara H, Ito Y, Oshima A - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Flow diagram for selection of analyzed men. FOBT, fecal occult blood testing; PSA, prostate-specific antigen.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317786&req=5

fig02: Flow diagram for selection of analyzed men. FOBT, fecal occult blood testing; PSA, prostate-specific antigen.
Mentions: Among men aged 40–64 years (n = 966), men who had had a diagnosis of colorectal or prostate cancer to date (n = 7 for colorectum and n = 3 for prostate), or had missing data for FOBT (n = 11) or PSA testing (n = 18) were excluded. The remaining 936 men were analyzed as total subjects (Fig.2). In an analytical framework to account for healthy-user bias, only responders for cancer screening (n = 464) were analyzed.

Bottom Line: Men who were older (prevalence ratio [PR] [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 2.17 [1.43, 3.28] for 60-64 years compared with 40-49 years), had technical or junior college education (PR [95% CI] = 1.76 [1.19, 2.59] compared with men with high school or less) and followed doctors' recommendations (PR [95% CI] = 1.50 [1.00, 2.26]) were significantly more likely to have PSA-screening after multiple variable adjustment among cancer-screening responders.Attenuation in PR of hypothesized common factors was observed among cancer-screening responders compared with the usual approach (among total subjects).Using the analytical framework to account for healthy-user bias, we found three factors related to participation in PSA-screening with attenuated association of common factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Cancer Control and Statistics, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka, Japan; Urban Research Plaza, Osaka City University, Osaka, Japan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus