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Estrogen adversely affects the prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

Hsu LH, Liu KJ, Tsai MF, Wu CR, Feng AC, Chu NM, Kao SH - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that the premenopausal patients had more advanced disease and a shorter survival among the never-smoking female patients with lung adenocarcinoma.We proposed a different pathway that estrogen upregulated the expression of osteopontin and then promoted cell migration through αvβ3 integrin binding and activated MEK-ERK signaling pathway, which is a common downstream pathway with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation.An additive effect of ER antagonists and EGFR antagonists on the inhibition of cell migration was also noted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University Medical School, Taipei, Taiwan.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Among the never-smoking female patients with lung adenocarcinoma, the premenopausal had a shorter survival. Kaplan–Meier survival estimates of: (a) lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by smoking history; (b) never-smoking lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by gender; (c–e) lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by gender in different age groups; and (f) never-smoking female lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by the menopausal status.
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fig01: Among the never-smoking female patients with lung adenocarcinoma, the premenopausal had a shorter survival. Kaplan–Meier survival estimates of: (a) lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by smoking history; (b) never-smoking lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by gender; (c–e) lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by gender in different age groups; and (f) never-smoking female lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by the menopausal status.

Mentions: In the patients with lung adenocarcinoma, multivariate analysis indicated that stage (hazard ratio [HR], 2.13; P < 0.01), age (HR, 1.36; P < 0.01) and smoking history (HR, 1.08; P < 0.01) were independent prognostic factors. Gender did not reach statistical significance (HR, 1.38; P = 0.41). The never-smokers had a longer survival than the smokers (median survival: 695 vs 493 days; P < 0.01) (Fig.1a). The survival was similar between never-smoking women and men (median survival: 715 vs 677 days; P = 0.39) (Fig.1b).


Estrogen adversely affects the prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

Hsu LH, Liu KJ, Tsai MF, Wu CR, Feng AC, Chu NM, Kao SH - Cancer Sci. (2014)

Among the never-smoking female patients with lung adenocarcinoma, the premenopausal had a shorter survival. Kaplan–Meier survival estimates of: (a) lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by smoking history; (b) never-smoking lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by gender; (c–e) lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by gender in different age groups; and (f) never-smoking female lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by the menopausal status.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317775&req=5

fig01: Among the never-smoking female patients with lung adenocarcinoma, the premenopausal had a shorter survival. Kaplan–Meier survival estimates of: (a) lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by smoking history; (b) never-smoking lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by gender; (c–e) lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by gender in different age groups; and (f) never-smoking female lung adenocarcinoma patients divided by the menopausal status.
Mentions: In the patients with lung adenocarcinoma, multivariate analysis indicated that stage (hazard ratio [HR], 2.13; P < 0.01), age (HR, 1.36; P < 0.01) and smoking history (HR, 1.08; P < 0.01) were independent prognostic factors. Gender did not reach statistical significance (HR, 1.38; P = 0.41). The never-smokers had a longer survival than the smokers (median survival: 695 vs 493 days; P < 0.01) (Fig.1a). The survival was similar between never-smoking women and men (median survival: 715 vs 677 days; P = 0.39) (Fig.1b).

Bottom Line: We found that the premenopausal patients had more advanced disease and a shorter survival among the never-smoking female patients with lung adenocarcinoma.We proposed a different pathway that estrogen upregulated the expression of osteopontin and then promoted cell migration through αvβ3 integrin binding and activated MEK-ERK signaling pathway, which is a common downstream pathway with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation.An additive effect of ER antagonists and EGFR antagonists on the inhibition of cell migration was also noted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University Medical School, Taipei, Taiwan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus