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Intestinal microbiota and diet in IBS: causes, consequences, or epiphenomena?

Rajilić-Stojanović M, Jonkers DM, Salonen A, Hanevik K, Raes J, Jalanka J, de Vos WM, Manichanh C, Golic N, Enck P, Philippou E, Iraqi FA, Clarke G, Spiller RC, Penders J - Am. J. Gastroenterol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous functional disorder with a multifactorial etiology that involves the interplay of both host and environmental factors.On the basis of the existing data, we suggest pathways (mechanisms) by which diet components, via the microbial fermentation, could trigger IBS symptoms.Finally, this review provides recommendations for future studies that would enable elucidation of the role of diet and microbiota and how these factors may be (inter)related in the pathophysiology of IBS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.

ABSTRACT
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous functional disorder with a multifactorial etiology that involves the interplay of both host and environmental factors. Among environmental factors relevant for IBS etiology, the diet stands out given that the majority of IBS patients report their symptoms to be triggered by meals or specific foods. The diet provides substrates for microbial fermentation, and, as the composition of the intestinal microbiota is disturbed in IBS patients, the link between diet, microbiota composition, and microbial fermentation products might have an essential role in IBS etiology. In this review, we summarize current evidence regarding the impact of diet and the intestinal microbiota on IBS symptoms, as well as the reported interactions between diet and the microbiota composition. On the basis of the existing data, we suggest pathways (mechanisms) by which diet components, via the microbial fermentation, could trigger IBS symptoms. Finally, this review provides recommendations for future studies that would enable elucidation of the role of diet and microbiota and how these factors may be (inter)related in the pathophysiology of IBS.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Non-exclusive listing of dietary metabolites that can be regulated by microbial activity and contribute to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. The impact of metabolites affecting different domains of intestinal health is depicted; however, it should be noted that the effects of some metabolites depend on their concentration or further conversion. Note: for immune modulation and barrier function, metabolites with positive and negative effects are colored in green and red, respectively. SCFAs, short-chain fatty acids; BAs, bile acids.
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fig2: Non-exclusive listing of dietary metabolites that can be regulated by microbial activity and contribute to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. The impact of metabolites affecting different domains of intestinal health is depicted; however, it should be noted that the effects of some metabolites depend on their concentration or further conversion. Note: for immune modulation and barrier function, metabolites with positive and negative effects are colored in green and red, respectively. SCFAs, short-chain fatty acids; BAs, bile acids.

Mentions: Intestinal microbes have an important role in the digestion of dietary components, resulting in metabolites that may directly or indirectly contribute to IBS symptoms (Figure 2).


Intestinal microbiota and diet in IBS: causes, consequences, or epiphenomena?

Rajilić-Stojanović M, Jonkers DM, Salonen A, Hanevik K, Raes J, Jalanka J, de Vos WM, Manichanh C, Golic N, Enck P, Philippou E, Iraqi FA, Clarke G, Spiller RC, Penders J - Am. J. Gastroenterol. (2015)

Non-exclusive listing of dietary metabolites that can be regulated by microbial activity and contribute to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. The impact of metabolites affecting different domains of intestinal health is depicted; however, it should be noted that the effects of some metabolites depend on their concentration or further conversion. Note: for immune modulation and barrier function, metabolites with positive and negative effects are colored in green and red, respectively. SCFAs, short-chain fatty acids; BAs, bile acids.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317767&req=5

fig2: Non-exclusive listing of dietary metabolites that can be regulated by microbial activity and contribute to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. The impact of metabolites affecting different domains of intestinal health is depicted; however, it should be noted that the effects of some metabolites depend on their concentration or further conversion. Note: for immune modulation and barrier function, metabolites with positive and negative effects are colored in green and red, respectively. SCFAs, short-chain fatty acids; BAs, bile acids.
Mentions: Intestinal microbes have an important role in the digestion of dietary components, resulting in metabolites that may directly or indirectly contribute to IBS symptoms (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous functional disorder with a multifactorial etiology that involves the interplay of both host and environmental factors.On the basis of the existing data, we suggest pathways (mechanisms) by which diet components, via the microbial fermentation, could trigger IBS symptoms.Finally, this review provides recommendations for future studies that would enable elucidation of the role of diet and microbiota and how these factors may be (inter)related in the pathophysiology of IBS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.

ABSTRACT
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous functional disorder with a multifactorial etiology that involves the interplay of both host and environmental factors. Among environmental factors relevant for IBS etiology, the diet stands out given that the majority of IBS patients report their symptoms to be triggered by meals or specific foods. The diet provides substrates for microbial fermentation, and, as the composition of the intestinal microbiota is disturbed in IBS patients, the link between diet, microbiota composition, and microbial fermentation products might have an essential role in IBS etiology. In this review, we summarize current evidence regarding the impact of diet and the intestinal microbiota on IBS symptoms, as well as the reported interactions between diet and the microbiota composition. On the basis of the existing data, we suggest pathways (mechanisms) by which diet components, via the microbial fermentation, could trigger IBS symptoms. Finally, this review provides recommendations for future studies that would enable elucidation of the role of diet and microbiota and how these factors may be (inter)related in the pathophysiology of IBS.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus