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Does kidney transplantation with deceased or living donor affect graft survival?

Nemati E, Einollahi B, Lesan Pezeshki M, Porfarziani V, Fattahi MR - Nephrourol Mon (2014)

Bottom Line: Today, the most serious challenge in transplantation is organ shortage; hence, using deceased donor is increasingly encouraged.Demographics and post-transplantation follow-up data including immunosuppression regimens, rejection episodes, and survival rates were evaluated.We found acceptable short-term survival in both groups; however, living donor recipients continue to have better long-term patient and graft survival rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: There are growing numbers of patients with end-stage renal disease globally at an unexpected rate. Today, the most serious challenge in transplantation is organ shortage; hence, using deceased donor is increasingly encouraged.

Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the differences in survival rates between kidney transplant recipients with deceased donor and living donor.

Patients and methods: In a retrospective cohort study, 218 patients who had undergone kidney transplantation in our institute from April 2008 to September 2010 were recruited. Demographics and post-transplantation follow-up data including immunosuppression regimens, rejection episodes, and survival rates were evaluated. The patients were assigned to two groups according to the donor kidney transplantation: group I, living donor kidney transplants; and group II, deceased donor kidney transplants.

Results: Although there were no significant differences in one-year survival rates of patient and graft between study groups, three-years survival rates of patient and graft were significantly longer in living donor kidney transplants in comparison with the deceased donor kidney recipients (P = 0.006 and P = 0.004, respectively). In Cox-regression model after adjusting for other confounding factors such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, and first- or second-time transplantation, overall patient and graft survivals were also significantly shorter in deceased kidney transplantation than those who received kidney from a living donor (HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2-10.4; and P = 0.02 for patient survival; and HR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5-19.5; and P = 0.009 for graft survival).

Conclusions: We found acceptable short-term survival in both groups; however, living donor recipients continue to have better long-term patient and graft survival rates.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graft Survival in Two Groups
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fig12152: Graft Survival in Two Groups

Mentions: Although there were no differences between one-year patient and graft survival rates between two groups, there were statistically significant differences in three-year patient and graft survival rates between them (P = 0.006 and P = 0.004, respectively) (Table 2) (Figures 1 and 2).


Does kidney transplantation with deceased or living donor affect graft survival?

Nemati E, Einollahi B, Lesan Pezeshki M, Porfarziani V, Fattahi MR - Nephrourol Mon (2014)

Graft Survival in Two Groups
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317718&req=5

fig12152: Graft Survival in Two Groups
Mentions: Although there were no differences between one-year patient and graft survival rates between two groups, there were statistically significant differences in three-year patient and graft survival rates between them (P = 0.006 and P = 0.004, respectively) (Table 2) (Figures 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: Today, the most serious challenge in transplantation is organ shortage; hence, using deceased donor is increasingly encouraged.Demographics and post-transplantation follow-up data including immunosuppression regimens, rejection episodes, and survival rates were evaluated.We found acceptable short-term survival in both groups; however, living donor recipients continue to have better long-term patient and graft survival rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: There are growing numbers of patients with end-stage renal disease globally at an unexpected rate. Today, the most serious challenge in transplantation is organ shortage; hence, using deceased donor is increasingly encouraged.

Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the differences in survival rates between kidney transplant recipients with deceased donor and living donor.

Patients and methods: In a retrospective cohort study, 218 patients who had undergone kidney transplantation in our institute from April 2008 to September 2010 were recruited. Demographics and post-transplantation follow-up data including immunosuppression regimens, rejection episodes, and survival rates were evaluated. The patients were assigned to two groups according to the donor kidney transplantation: group I, living donor kidney transplants; and group II, deceased donor kidney transplants.

Results: Although there were no significant differences in one-year survival rates of patient and graft between study groups, three-years survival rates of patient and graft were significantly longer in living donor kidney transplants in comparison with the deceased donor kidney recipients (P = 0.006 and P = 0.004, respectively). In Cox-regression model after adjusting for other confounding factors such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, and first- or second-time transplantation, overall patient and graft survivals were also significantly shorter in deceased kidney transplantation than those who received kidney from a living donor (HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2-10.4; and P = 0.02 for patient survival; and HR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5-19.5; and P = 0.009 for graft survival).

Conclusions: We found acceptable short-term survival in both groups; however, living donor recipients continue to have better long-term patient and graft survival rates.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus