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Nonvolatile electric-field control of magnetization in a Y-type hexaferrite.

Shen S, Chai Y, Sun Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic materials enable the mutual control of electric polarization by a magnetic field and magnetization by an electric field.Here we demonstrate the prominent direct and converse magnetoelectric effects in the Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22 single crystal.These diverse magnetoelectric effects with large coefficients highlight the promise of hexaferrites as potential multiferroic materials.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.

ABSTRACT
The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic materials enable the mutual control of electric polarization by a magnetic field and magnetization by an electric field. Nonvolatile electric-field control of magnetization is extremely important for information storage applications, but has been rarely realized in single-phase multiferroic materials. Here we demonstrate the prominent direct and converse magnetoelectric effects in the Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22 single crystal. The electric polarization due to conical magnetic structure can be totally reversed by a small magnetic field, giving rise to large magnetoelectric coefficients of 6000 and 4000 ps/m at 100 and 200 K, respectively. The ab-plane magnetization can be controlled by electric fields with a large hysteresis, leading to nonvolatile change of magnetization. In addition, the reversal of magnetization by electric fields is also realized at 200 K. These diverse magnetoelectric effects with large coefficients highlight the promise of hexaferrites as potential multiferroic materials.

No MeSH data available.


The reversal of magnetization by electric field.(a) Magnetization as a function of electric field measured with a bias magnetic field H = −10 Oe at 200 K. The inset shows the M – H hysteresis loop at low magnetic fields. (b) Electric-field reversal of magnetization under a small bias magnetic field H = −10 Oe.
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f4: The reversal of magnetization by electric field.(a) Magnetization as a function of electric field measured with a bias magnetic field H = −10 Oe at 200 K. The inset shows the M – H hysteresis loop at low magnetic fields. (b) Electric-field reversal of magnetization under a small bias magnetic field H = −10 Oe.

Mentions: Next, we performed similar measurements at 200 K. Fig. 4a displays the M – E curve showing a large hysteresis at 200 K with external H = −10 Oe along [100] direction. Compared with that at 100 K, the M – E curve at 200 K is more asymmetric and M almost remains constant with decreasing negative E-scan. With the same fitting method taken at 100 K, we got αe = 1100 ps/m and γ = 535 ps/MV at 200 K. Such a large quadratic coefficient γ is likely to be the reason for the asymmetric shape of the M – E curve at 200 K. This quadratic converse ME effect is possibly introduced by the new PE phase around zero magnetic field, as our magnetic and magnetodielectric measurements have suggested the existence of mixed phases at this temperature and the transverse cone is responsible for the linear converse ME effect, which has been evidenced by the results at 100 K. the substantial hysteresis at 200 K suggests its potential for nonvolatile magnetic states controlled by E, just like that at 100 K. A distinguished feature at 200 K is the reversal of M by E field. Fig. 4b demonstrates the repeated reversal of M by switching the polarity of electric field (E = ±1 MV/m) under a small bias H = −10 Oe at 200 K. The positive E causes an increase in M, while the negative E leads to polarity reversal of M.


Nonvolatile electric-field control of magnetization in a Y-type hexaferrite.

Shen S, Chai Y, Sun Y - Sci Rep (2015)

The reversal of magnetization by electric field.(a) Magnetization as a function of electric field measured with a bias magnetic field H = −10 Oe at 200 K. The inset shows the M – H hysteresis loop at low magnetic fields. (b) Electric-field reversal of magnetization under a small bias magnetic field H = −10 Oe.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317709&req=5

f4: The reversal of magnetization by electric field.(a) Magnetization as a function of electric field measured with a bias magnetic field H = −10 Oe at 200 K. The inset shows the M – H hysteresis loop at low magnetic fields. (b) Electric-field reversal of magnetization under a small bias magnetic field H = −10 Oe.
Mentions: Next, we performed similar measurements at 200 K. Fig. 4a displays the M – E curve showing a large hysteresis at 200 K with external H = −10 Oe along [100] direction. Compared with that at 100 K, the M – E curve at 200 K is more asymmetric and M almost remains constant with decreasing negative E-scan. With the same fitting method taken at 100 K, we got αe = 1100 ps/m and γ = 535 ps/MV at 200 K. Such a large quadratic coefficient γ is likely to be the reason for the asymmetric shape of the M – E curve at 200 K. This quadratic converse ME effect is possibly introduced by the new PE phase around zero magnetic field, as our magnetic and magnetodielectric measurements have suggested the existence of mixed phases at this temperature and the transverse cone is responsible for the linear converse ME effect, which has been evidenced by the results at 100 K. the substantial hysteresis at 200 K suggests its potential for nonvolatile magnetic states controlled by E, just like that at 100 K. A distinguished feature at 200 K is the reversal of M by E field. Fig. 4b demonstrates the repeated reversal of M by switching the polarity of electric field (E = ±1 MV/m) under a small bias H = −10 Oe at 200 K. The positive E causes an increase in M, while the negative E leads to polarity reversal of M.

Bottom Line: The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic materials enable the mutual control of electric polarization by a magnetic field and magnetization by an electric field.Here we demonstrate the prominent direct and converse magnetoelectric effects in the Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22 single crystal.These diverse magnetoelectric effects with large coefficients highlight the promise of hexaferrites as potential multiferroic materials.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.

ABSTRACT
The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic materials enable the mutual control of electric polarization by a magnetic field and magnetization by an electric field. Nonvolatile electric-field control of magnetization is extremely important for information storage applications, but has been rarely realized in single-phase multiferroic materials. Here we demonstrate the prominent direct and converse magnetoelectric effects in the Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22 single crystal. The electric polarization due to conical magnetic structure can be totally reversed by a small magnetic field, giving rise to large magnetoelectric coefficients of 6000 and 4000 ps/m at 100 and 200 K, respectively. The ab-plane magnetization can be controlled by electric fields with a large hysteresis, leading to nonvolatile change of magnetization. In addition, the reversal of magnetization by electric fields is also realized at 200 K. These diverse magnetoelectric effects with large coefficients highlight the promise of hexaferrites as potential multiferroic materials.

No MeSH data available.