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Nonvolatile electric-field control of magnetization in a Y-type hexaferrite.

Shen S, Chai Y, Sun Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic materials enable the mutual control of electric polarization by a magnetic field and magnetization by an electric field.Here we demonstrate the prominent direct and converse magnetoelectric effects in the Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22 single crystal.These diverse magnetoelectric effects with large coefficients highlight the promise of hexaferrites as potential multiferroic materials.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.

ABSTRACT
The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic materials enable the mutual control of electric polarization by a magnetic field and magnetization by an electric field. Nonvolatile electric-field control of magnetization is extremely important for information storage applications, but has been rarely realized in single-phase multiferroic materials. Here we demonstrate the prominent direct and converse magnetoelectric effects in the Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22 single crystal. The electric polarization due to conical magnetic structure can be totally reversed by a small magnetic field, giving rise to large magnetoelectric coefficients of 6000 and 4000 ps/m at 100 and 200 K, respectively. The ab-plane magnetization can be controlled by electric fields with a large hysteresis, leading to nonvolatile change of magnetization. In addition, the reversal of magnetization by electric fields is also realized at 200 K. These diverse magnetoelectric effects with large coefficients highlight the promise of hexaferrites as potential multiferroic materials.

No MeSH data available.


Magnetic field control of electric polarization.(a) The magnetodielectric ratio Δε(H)/ε(50 kOe) = [ε(H)-ε(5 kOe)]/ε(5 kOe) at selected temperatures. (b) The details of the magnetodielectric behavior around zero field. (c) The magnetoelectric phase diagram of BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22. (d) Magnetic field reversal of in-plane electric polarization at 100, 150, and 200 K. The inset shows the magnetoelectric current near zero magnetic field.
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f2: Magnetic field control of electric polarization.(a) The magnetodielectric ratio Δε(H)/ε(50 kOe) = [ε(H)-ε(5 kOe)]/ε(5 kOe) at selected temperatures. (b) The details of the magnetodielectric behavior around zero field. (c) The magnetoelectric phase diagram of BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22. (d) Magnetic field reversal of in-plane electric polarization at 100, 150, and 200 K. The inset shows the magnetoelectric current near zero magnetic field.

Mentions: To check the nature of magnetic-order-induced FE phase, we measured the in-plane (H // [100] and E // [120]) magnetodielectric properties at different temperatures. Fig. 2a shows the relative change of dielectric constant, Δε(H)/ε(50 kOe) = [ε(H)-ε(50 kOe)]/ε(50 kOe), at selected temperatures. At high fields, there are broad peaks at all temperatures, corresponding to the transitions from PE to FE or FE to PE phase. Fig. 2b shows the detailed magnetodielectric behaviors near zero field. Below 200 K, only one single dielectric constant peak appears at low magnetic field, indicating the switching of FE domain, which is also confirmed by the P – H curves in Fig. 2d. At 200 K, a slight shoulder feature starts appearing at finite H, signaling a new phase coexists with FE phase near zero field. This new phase is none other than PE phase mentioned above. With further rising temperature, the intensity of the shoulders increase gradually and the height of zero-field single peak decreases simultaneously. At 300 K, the zero-field single peak completely disappears and is replaced by the double peaks around H = ±2 kOe, which marks FE – PE – FE double phase transitions. All these magnetodielectric behaviors are in accordance with the M – T curve (Fig. 1c). Based on the magnetodielectric data, we obtain the magnetoelectric phase diagram shown in Fig. 2c. Below T1, only transverse cone (FE phase) exists around zero fields and the reversal of electric polarization by magnetic field can be attributed to direct in-plane reversal of the transverse cone state. Above T1, the PE phase would emerge and coexist with the FE phase near zero fields. With temperature further rising, the PE phase gradually dominates near zero fields at high temperatures.


Nonvolatile electric-field control of magnetization in a Y-type hexaferrite.

Shen S, Chai Y, Sun Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Magnetic field control of electric polarization.(a) The magnetodielectric ratio Δε(H)/ε(50 kOe) = [ε(H)-ε(5 kOe)]/ε(5 kOe) at selected temperatures. (b) The details of the magnetodielectric behavior around zero field. (c) The magnetoelectric phase diagram of BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22. (d) Magnetic field reversal of in-plane electric polarization at 100, 150, and 200 K. The inset shows the magnetoelectric current near zero magnetic field.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317709&req=5

f2: Magnetic field control of electric polarization.(a) The magnetodielectric ratio Δε(H)/ε(50 kOe) = [ε(H)-ε(5 kOe)]/ε(5 kOe) at selected temperatures. (b) The details of the magnetodielectric behavior around zero field. (c) The magnetoelectric phase diagram of BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22. (d) Magnetic field reversal of in-plane electric polarization at 100, 150, and 200 K. The inset shows the magnetoelectric current near zero magnetic field.
Mentions: To check the nature of magnetic-order-induced FE phase, we measured the in-plane (H // [100] and E // [120]) magnetodielectric properties at different temperatures. Fig. 2a shows the relative change of dielectric constant, Δε(H)/ε(50 kOe) = [ε(H)-ε(50 kOe)]/ε(50 kOe), at selected temperatures. At high fields, there are broad peaks at all temperatures, corresponding to the transitions from PE to FE or FE to PE phase. Fig. 2b shows the detailed magnetodielectric behaviors near zero field. Below 200 K, only one single dielectric constant peak appears at low magnetic field, indicating the switching of FE domain, which is also confirmed by the P – H curves in Fig. 2d. At 200 K, a slight shoulder feature starts appearing at finite H, signaling a new phase coexists with FE phase near zero field. This new phase is none other than PE phase mentioned above. With further rising temperature, the intensity of the shoulders increase gradually and the height of zero-field single peak decreases simultaneously. At 300 K, the zero-field single peak completely disappears and is replaced by the double peaks around H = ±2 kOe, which marks FE – PE – FE double phase transitions. All these magnetodielectric behaviors are in accordance with the M – T curve (Fig. 1c). Based on the magnetodielectric data, we obtain the magnetoelectric phase diagram shown in Fig. 2c. Below T1, only transverse cone (FE phase) exists around zero fields and the reversal of electric polarization by magnetic field can be attributed to direct in-plane reversal of the transverse cone state. Above T1, the PE phase would emerge and coexist with the FE phase near zero fields. With temperature further rising, the PE phase gradually dominates near zero fields at high temperatures.

Bottom Line: The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic materials enable the mutual control of electric polarization by a magnetic field and magnetization by an electric field.Here we demonstrate the prominent direct and converse magnetoelectric effects in the Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22 single crystal.These diverse magnetoelectric effects with large coefficients highlight the promise of hexaferrites as potential multiferroic materials.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.

ABSTRACT
The magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic materials enable the mutual control of electric polarization by a magnetic field and magnetization by an electric field. Nonvolatile electric-field control of magnetization is extremely important for information storage applications, but has been rarely realized in single-phase multiferroic materials. Here we demonstrate the prominent direct and converse magnetoelectric effects in the Y-type hexaferrite BaSrCoZnFe11AlO22 single crystal. The electric polarization due to conical magnetic structure can be totally reversed by a small magnetic field, giving rise to large magnetoelectric coefficients of 6000 and 4000 ps/m at 100 and 200 K, respectively. The ab-plane magnetization can be controlled by electric fields with a large hysteresis, leading to nonvolatile change of magnetization. In addition, the reversal of magnetization by electric fields is also realized at 200 K. These diverse magnetoelectric effects with large coefficients highlight the promise of hexaferrites as potential multiferroic materials.

No MeSH data available.