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Bimaxillary orthognathic surgery and condylectomy for mandibular condyle osteochondroma: a case report.

Park YW, Lee WY, Kwon KJ, Kim SG, Lee SK - Maxillofac Plast Reconstr Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: Osteochondroma is rarely reported in the maxillofacial region; however, it is prevalent in the mandibular condyle.There was no recurrence at least for 1 year after the operation.Patient's functional and esthetic rehabilitation was uneventful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University, 7 jukheon-gil, Gangneung, 210-702 Gangwondo Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Osteochondroma is rarely reported in the maxillofacial region; however, it is prevalent in the mandibular condyle. This slowly growing tumor may lead to malocclusion and facial asymmetry. A 39-year-old woman complained of gradual development of anterior and posterior unilateral crossbite, which resulted in facial asymmetry. A radiological study disclosed a large tumor mass on the top of the left mandibular condyle. This bony tumor was surgically removed through condylectomy and the remaining condyle head was secured. Subsequently, bimaxillary orthognathic surgery was performed to correct facial asymmetry and malocclusion. Pathological diagnosis was osteochondroma; immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor exhibited a conspicuous expression of BMP-4 and BMP-2 but rarely expression of PCNA. There was no recurrence at least for 1 year after the operation. Patient's functional and esthetic rehabilitation was uneventful.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photomicrographs of osteochondroma. (A) Hematoxylin and eosin staining showing proliferation of chondroid tissue deeply into marrow spaces, producing trabecular ossification. A2 is a higher magnification of panel A1. (B) Immunostaining for BMP-4, which is diffusely positive in the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix (arrows). (C) Immunostaining for BMP-2, which is slightly positive in the trabecular bone (arrows). (D) Immunostaining for PCNA, which is positive in a small number of tumor cells.
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Fig3: Photomicrographs of osteochondroma. (A) Hematoxylin and eosin staining showing proliferation of chondroid tissue deeply into marrow spaces, producing trabecular ossification. A2 is a higher magnification of panel A1. (B) Immunostaining for BMP-4, which is diffusely positive in the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix (arrows). (C) Immunostaining for BMP-2, which is slightly positive in the trabecular bone (arrows). (D) Immunostaining for PCNA, which is positive in a small number of tumor cells.

Mentions: On histological examination, a chondroid mass was found on the capsule of the mandibular condyle, which was extended into underlying trabecular bones. The chondroid tissue showed many hyperplastic chondrocytes, which were mostly surrounded by hyalinized matrix and subsequently underwent ossification to produce trabecular bones. The underlying trabecular bones were irregular in shape and anastomosed each other, resulting in cancellous bone with abundant marrow stromal tissue (Figures 3; A1, A2). On immunohistochemical staining, the chondroid tissue was conspicuously positive for BMP-4 (bone morphogenetic protein-4; antibody was from Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA, USA) (Figures 3; B1, B2) and the trabecular bones were slightly positive for BMP-2 (bone morphogenetic protein-2; antibody was from Santa Cruz Biotechnology) (Figure 3; C). This tumor was finally diagnosed as osteochondroma, and the entire tumor tissue examined was rarely positive for PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen; antibody was from DAKO, Glostrup, Denmark) (Figure 3; D).Figure 3


Bimaxillary orthognathic surgery and condylectomy for mandibular condyle osteochondroma: a case report.

Park YW, Lee WY, Kwon KJ, Kim SG, Lee SK - Maxillofac Plast Reconstr Surg (2015)

Photomicrographs of osteochondroma. (A) Hematoxylin and eosin staining showing proliferation of chondroid tissue deeply into marrow spaces, producing trabecular ossification. A2 is a higher magnification of panel A1. (B) Immunostaining for BMP-4, which is diffusely positive in the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix (arrows). (C) Immunostaining for BMP-2, which is slightly positive in the trabecular bone (arrows). (D) Immunostaining for PCNA, which is positive in a small number of tumor cells.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317525&req=5

Fig3: Photomicrographs of osteochondroma. (A) Hematoxylin and eosin staining showing proliferation of chondroid tissue deeply into marrow spaces, producing trabecular ossification. A2 is a higher magnification of panel A1. (B) Immunostaining for BMP-4, which is diffusely positive in the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix (arrows). (C) Immunostaining for BMP-2, which is slightly positive in the trabecular bone (arrows). (D) Immunostaining for PCNA, which is positive in a small number of tumor cells.
Mentions: On histological examination, a chondroid mass was found on the capsule of the mandibular condyle, which was extended into underlying trabecular bones. The chondroid tissue showed many hyperplastic chondrocytes, which were mostly surrounded by hyalinized matrix and subsequently underwent ossification to produce trabecular bones. The underlying trabecular bones were irregular in shape and anastomosed each other, resulting in cancellous bone with abundant marrow stromal tissue (Figures 3; A1, A2). On immunohistochemical staining, the chondroid tissue was conspicuously positive for BMP-4 (bone morphogenetic protein-4; antibody was from Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA, USA) (Figures 3; B1, B2) and the trabecular bones were slightly positive for BMP-2 (bone morphogenetic protein-2; antibody was from Santa Cruz Biotechnology) (Figure 3; C). This tumor was finally diagnosed as osteochondroma, and the entire tumor tissue examined was rarely positive for PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen; antibody was from DAKO, Glostrup, Denmark) (Figure 3; D).Figure 3

Bottom Line: Osteochondroma is rarely reported in the maxillofacial region; however, it is prevalent in the mandibular condyle.There was no recurrence at least for 1 year after the operation.Patient's functional and esthetic rehabilitation was uneventful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University, 7 jukheon-gil, Gangneung, 210-702 Gangwondo Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Osteochondroma is rarely reported in the maxillofacial region; however, it is prevalent in the mandibular condyle. This slowly growing tumor may lead to malocclusion and facial asymmetry. A 39-year-old woman complained of gradual development of anterior and posterior unilateral crossbite, which resulted in facial asymmetry. A radiological study disclosed a large tumor mass on the top of the left mandibular condyle. This bony tumor was surgically removed through condylectomy and the remaining condyle head was secured. Subsequently, bimaxillary orthognathic surgery was performed to correct facial asymmetry and malocclusion. Pathological diagnosis was osteochondroma; immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor exhibited a conspicuous expression of BMP-4 and BMP-2 but rarely expression of PCNA. There was no recurrence at least for 1 year after the operation. Patient's functional and esthetic rehabilitation was uneventful.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus