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Lung cancer patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutation among those infected by human immunodeficiency virus.

Okuma Y, Hosomi Y, Imamura A - Onco Targets Ther (2014)

Bottom Line: Herein, we present two cases of advanced non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutations in patients treated with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors.Case 1 was treated with erlotinib for recurrent adenocarcinoma metastasizing to the liver and brain harboring EGFR mutation in exon 21 L858R.The duration of treatment efficacy was 9.7 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic Oncology and Respiratory Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious diseases Center Komagome Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, lung cancer has become a crucial health problem among individuals living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In East Asian populations, the frequency of lung cancer patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations is greater than in other populations. Herein, we present two cases of advanced non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutations in patients treated with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Both patients were male, 67 and 59 years of age, with known HIV infection and immunologically stable disease with antiretroviral therapy. Case 1 was treated with erlotinib for recurrent adenocarcinoma metastasizing to the liver and brain harboring EGFR mutation in exon 21 L858R. The duration of treatment efficacy was 9.7 months. Case 2 had an EGFR mutation exon 19 in-frame deletion with bone metastasis and was treated with gefitinib for 22.1 months in combination with antiretroviral therapy. These advanced lung cancer patients living with HIV with EGFR mutations demonstrate the promising effectiveness and safety of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors concomitant with antiretroviral therapy for an extended period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Multiple metastases in the hip muscle along the surgical incision.Notes: (A) At the time of the recurrence. (B) Three months later, shrinkage was sustained for more than 19 months with gefitinib treatment.
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f2-ott-8-111: Multiple metastases in the hip muscle along the surgical incision.Notes: (A) At the time of the recurrence. (B) Three months later, shrinkage was sustained for more than 19 months with gefitinib treatment.

Mentions: A 59 year old male patient underwent surgery for early lung cancer of T2aN0M0 before surgery and was diagnosed with T2aN2M0 stage IIIA pathologically. The patient underwent antiretroviral therapy (emtricitabine/tenofovir/darunavir) for 1 month before lung cancer was suspected. He was previously a light smoker. His CDC classification system for HIV was A3 (CD4 cell count 120 cells/μL and viral load 2.1×104 copies/μL). His EGFR mutation status was exon 21 L858R. He was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin/vinorelbine). His antiretroviral therapy was changed from danavir, a protease inhibitor, to raltegravir before adjuvant chemotherapy. He completed four subsequent cycles of chemotherapy; however, he suffered from disseminated varicella zoster during his last cycle. Six months later, recurrent left femoral bone metastasis with pathological fracture appeared; therefore, he underwent artificial femoral head replacement followed by radiotherapy to the femoral bone at a dose of 37.5 Gy. However, 3 months later, multiple recurrences appeared in the left hip along the surgical scar (Figure 2A). He began treatment with gefitinib with poor performance status. A mild rash appeared, but he continued gefitinib treatment for 22.1 months (Figure 2B) until disease progression.


Lung cancer patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutation among those infected by human immunodeficiency virus.

Okuma Y, Hosomi Y, Imamura A - Onco Targets Ther (2014)

Multiple metastases in the hip muscle along the surgical incision.Notes: (A) At the time of the recurrence. (B) Three months later, shrinkage was sustained for more than 19 months with gefitinib treatment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4317148&req=5

f2-ott-8-111: Multiple metastases in the hip muscle along the surgical incision.Notes: (A) At the time of the recurrence. (B) Three months later, shrinkage was sustained for more than 19 months with gefitinib treatment.
Mentions: A 59 year old male patient underwent surgery for early lung cancer of T2aN0M0 before surgery and was diagnosed with T2aN2M0 stage IIIA pathologically. The patient underwent antiretroviral therapy (emtricitabine/tenofovir/darunavir) for 1 month before lung cancer was suspected. He was previously a light smoker. His CDC classification system for HIV was A3 (CD4 cell count 120 cells/μL and viral load 2.1×104 copies/μL). His EGFR mutation status was exon 21 L858R. He was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin/vinorelbine). His antiretroviral therapy was changed from danavir, a protease inhibitor, to raltegravir before adjuvant chemotherapy. He completed four subsequent cycles of chemotherapy; however, he suffered from disseminated varicella zoster during his last cycle. Six months later, recurrent left femoral bone metastasis with pathological fracture appeared; therefore, he underwent artificial femoral head replacement followed by radiotherapy to the femoral bone at a dose of 37.5 Gy. However, 3 months later, multiple recurrences appeared in the left hip along the surgical scar (Figure 2A). He began treatment with gefitinib with poor performance status. A mild rash appeared, but he continued gefitinib treatment for 22.1 months (Figure 2B) until disease progression.

Bottom Line: Herein, we present two cases of advanced non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutations in patients treated with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors.Case 1 was treated with erlotinib for recurrent adenocarcinoma metastasizing to the liver and brain harboring EGFR mutation in exon 21 L858R.The duration of treatment efficacy was 9.7 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic Oncology and Respiratory Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious diseases Center Komagome Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, lung cancer has become a crucial health problem among individuals living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In East Asian populations, the frequency of lung cancer patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations is greater than in other populations. Herein, we present two cases of advanced non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutations in patients treated with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Both patients were male, 67 and 59 years of age, with known HIV infection and immunologically stable disease with antiretroviral therapy. Case 1 was treated with erlotinib for recurrent adenocarcinoma metastasizing to the liver and brain harboring EGFR mutation in exon 21 L858R. The duration of treatment efficacy was 9.7 months. Case 2 had an EGFR mutation exon 19 in-frame deletion with bone metastasis and was treated with gefitinib for 22.1 months in combination with antiretroviral therapy. These advanced lung cancer patients living with HIV with EGFR mutations demonstrate the promising effectiveness and safety of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors concomitant with antiretroviral therapy for an extended period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus