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Outcomes of ab interno trabeculectomy with the trabectome after failed trabeculectomy.

Bussel II, Kaplowitz K, Schuman JS, Loewen NA, Trabectome Study Gro - Br J Ophthalmol (2014)

Bottom Line: Outcomes included IOP, medications, complications, secondary procedures and success, defined as IOP of less than 21 mm Hg and a greater than 20% reduction from baseline without further surgery.At 1 year, mean IOP in AIT significantly decreased by 28% from 23.7±5.5 mm Hg, and medications from 2.8±1.2 to 2±1.3 (n=58).Both AIT and phaco-AIT showed a reduction in IOP and medication use after 1 year, suggesting that AIT with or without cataract surgery is a safe and effective option following failed trabeculectomy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, UPMC Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Preoperative and postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements (top) and change in glaucoma medications (bottom) over time in ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT) (left) and phaco-AIT (right).
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BJOPHTHALMOL2013304717F2: Preoperative and postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements (top) and change in glaucoma medications (bottom) over time in ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT) (left) and phaco-AIT (right).

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the preoperative and postoperative IOP measurements and change in glaucoma medications over time in AIT and phaco-AIT, respectively. In the AIT group, the mean IOP was reduced from 23.7±5.5 to 16.2±3.9 mm Hg (28% mean reduction, p<0.01) and the number of medications was reduced from 2.8±1.2 to 2.0±1.3 (p<0.01) at 1 year. In the phaco-AIT group, the mean IOP was reduced from 20.0±5.9 to 15.6±5.1 mm Hg (19% mean reduction, p=0.11), while the mean number of medications was reduced from 2.5±1.5 to 1.6±1.4 (p=0.24) at 1 year.


Outcomes of ab interno trabeculectomy with the trabectome after failed trabeculectomy.

Bussel II, Kaplowitz K, Schuman JS, Loewen NA, Trabectome Study Gro - Br J Ophthalmol (2014)

Preoperative and postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements (top) and change in glaucoma medications (bottom) over time in ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT) (left) and phaco-AIT (right).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4316927&req=5

BJOPHTHALMOL2013304717F2: Preoperative and postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements (top) and change in glaucoma medications (bottom) over time in ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT) (left) and phaco-AIT (right).
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the preoperative and postoperative IOP measurements and change in glaucoma medications over time in AIT and phaco-AIT, respectively. In the AIT group, the mean IOP was reduced from 23.7±5.5 to 16.2±3.9 mm Hg (28% mean reduction, p<0.01) and the number of medications was reduced from 2.8±1.2 to 2.0±1.3 (p<0.01) at 1 year. In the phaco-AIT group, the mean IOP was reduced from 20.0±5.9 to 15.6±5.1 mm Hg (19% mean reduction, p=0.11), while the mean number of medications was reduced from 2.5±1.5 to 1.6±1.4 (p=0.24) at 1 year.

Bottom Line: Outcomes included IOP, medications, complications, secondary procedures and success, defined as IOP of less than 21 mm Hg and a greater than 20% reduction from baseline without further surgery.At 1 year, mean IOP in AIT significantly decreased by 28% from 23.7±5.5 mm Hg, and medications from 2.8±1.2 to 2±1.3 (n=58).Both AIT and phaco-AIT showed a reduction in IOP and medication use after 1 year, suggesting that AIT with or without cataract surgery is a safe and effective option following failed trabeculectomy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, UPMC Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus