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Association between implant apex and sinus floor in posterior maxilla dental implantation: A three-dimensional finite element analysis.

Yan X, Zhang X, Chi W, Ai H, Wu L - Exp Ther Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Six models were constructed with the same thickness of crestal cortical bone and a 1-mm thick sinus floor cortical bone, but differing heights of alveolar ridge (between 10 and 14 mm).The four models of the second group were similar (11-mm-high alveolar ridge and 1-mm-thick crestal cortical bone) but with a changing thickness of sinus floor cortical bone (between 0.5 and 2.0 mm).An inclined force of 129 N was applied.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the association between the implant apex and the sinus floor in posterior maxilla dental implantation by means of three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) analysis. Ten 3D FE models of a posterior maxillary region with a sinus membrane and different heights of alveolar ridge with different thicknesses of sinus floor cortical bone were constructed according to anatomical data of the sinus area. Six models were constructed with the same thickness of crestal cortical bone and a 1-mm thick sinus floor cortical bone, but differing heights of alveolar ridge (between 10 and 14 mm). The four models of the second group were similar (11-mm-high alveolar ridge and 1-mm-thick crestal cortical bone) but with a changing thickness of sinus floor cortical bone (between 0.5 and 2.0 mm). The standard implant model based on the Nobel Biocare(®) implant system was created by computer-aided design (CAD) software and assembled into the models. The materials were assumed to be isotropic and linearly elastic. An inclined force of 129 N was applied. The maximum von Mises stress, stress distribution, implant displacement and resonance frequencies were calculated using CAD software. The von Mises stress was concentrated on the surface of the crestal cortical bone around the implant neck with the exception of that for the bicortical implantation. For immediate loading, when the implant apex broke into or through the sinus cortical bone, the maximum displacements of the implant, particularly at the implant apex, were smaller than those in the other groups. With increasing depth of the implant apex in the sinus floor cortical bone, the maximum displacements decreased and the implant axial resonance frequencies presented a linear upward tendency, but buccolingual resonance frequencies were hardly affected. This FE study on the association between implant apex and sinus floor showed that having the implant apex in contact with, piercing or breaking through the sinus floor cortical bone benefited the implant stability, particularly for immediate loading.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vibrational modes of the bone-implant complex. (A) Axial mode; (B) bending mode.
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f8-etm-09-03-0868: Vibrational modes of the bone-implant complex. (A) Axial mode; (B) bending mode.

Mentions: Fig. 8 shows the two vibrational modes of the implant-bone system. The data of implant axial resonance frequencies are shown in Fig. 9A (groups 1 and 2) and Fig. 9B (groups 3 and 4), and implant buccolingual resonance frequencies are shown in Fig. 10A (groups 1 and 2) and Fig. 10B (groups 3 and 4). As the distance between the implant apex and the sinus floor cortical bone lengthened (Fig. 9A), the values of the axial resonance frequencies increased significantly between models 1-1 and 1-2 in immediate and conventional loading. The resonance frequencies subsequently increased slowly. As the depth the implant apex penetrated into the sinus floor cortical bone increased, the axial resonance frequencies exhibited a linear upward tendency (Fig. 9B). The buccolingual resonance frequencies imperceptibly decreased as the distance between the implant apex and sinus floor cortical bone lengthened. No significant changes in frequency were observed when the penetration depth into the sinus floor cortical bone was adjusted (Fig. 10).


Association between implant apex and sinus floor in posterior maxilla dental implantation: A three-dimensional finite element analysis.

Yan X, Zhang X, Chi W, Ai H, Wu L - Exp Ther Med (2015)

Vibrational modes of the bone-implant complex. (A) Axial mode; (B) bending mode.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4316907&req=5

f8-etm-09-03-0868: Vibrational modes of the bone-implant complex. (A) Axial mode; (B) bending mode.
Mentions: Fig. 8 shows the two vibrational modes of the implant-bone system. The data of implant axial resonance frequencies are shown in Fig. 9A (groups 1 and 2) and Fig. 9B (groups 3 and 4), and implant buccolingual resonance frequencies are shown in Fig. 10A (groups 1 and 2) and Fig. 10B (groups 3 and 4). As the distance between the implant apex and the sinus floor cortical bone lengthened (Fig. 9A), the values of the axial resonance frequencies increased significantly between models 1-1 and 1-2 in immediate and conventional loading. The resonance frequencies subsequently increased slowly. As the depth the implant apex penetrated into the sinus floor cortical bone increased, the axial resonance frequencies exhibited a linear upward tendency (Fig. 9B). The buccolingual resonance frequencies imperceptibly decreased as the distance between the implant apex and sinus floor cortical bone lengthened. No significant changes in frequency were observed when the penetration depth into the sinus floor cortical bone was adjusted (Fig. 10).

Bottom Line: Six models were constructed with the same thickness of crestal cortical bone and a 1-mm thick sinus floor cortical bone, but differing heights of alveolar ridge (between 10 and 14 mm).The four models of the second group were similar (11-mm-high alveolar ridge and 1-mm-thick crestal cortical bone) but with a changing thickness of sinus floor cortical bone (between 0.5 and 2.0 mm).An inclined force of 129 N was applied.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the association between the implant apex and the sinus floor in posterior maxilla dental implantation by means of three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) analysis. Ten 3D FE models of a posterior maxillary region with a sinus membrane and different heights of alveolar ridge with different thicknesses of sinus floor cortical bone were constructed according to anatomical data of the sinus area. Six models were constructed with the same thickness of crestal cortical bone and a 1-mm thick sinus floor cortical bone, but differing heights of alveolar ridge (between 10 and 14 mm). The four models of the second group were similar (11-mm-high alveolar ridge and 1-mm-thick crestal cortical bone) but with a changing thickness of sinus floor cortical bone (between 0.5 and 2.0 mm). The standard implant model based on the Nobel Biocare(®) implant system was created by computer-aided design (CAD) software and assembled into the models. The materials were assumed to be isotropic and linearly elastic. An inclined force of 129 N was applied. The maximum von Mises stress, stress distribution, implant displacement and resonance frequencies were calculated using CAD software. The von Mises stress was concentrated on the surface of the crestal cortical bone around the implant neck with the exception of that for the bicortical implantation. For immediate loading, when the implant apex broke into or through the sinus cortical bone, the maximum displacements of the implant, particularly at the implant apex, were smaller than those in the other groups. With increasing depth of the implant apex in the sinus floor cortical bone, the maximum displacements decreased and the implant axial resonance frequencies presented a linear upward tendency, but buccolingual resonance frequencies were hardly affected. This FE study on the association between implant apex and sinus floor showed that having the implant apex in contact with, piercing or breaking through the sinus floor cortical bone benefited the implant stability, particularly for immediate loading.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus